College Council Agenda and Attachments

college council agenda

& attachments

October 19, 2011

COMPLETE version

JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE

The City University of New York

The College Council

October 19, 2011

1:40 p.m.

630T

I. Adoption of the Agenda

II. Minutes of the September 22, 2011 College Council (attachment A), Pg. 2

III. Report from the Undergraduate Curriculum and Academic Standards Committee

(attachments B1 – B5) – Dean Lopes

Programs

B1. Proposal to Establish a Dual/Joint Program in Associate in Science in

Accounting for Forensic Accounting (QCC) Leading to the Bachelor of

Science in Economics (John Jay), Pg. 5

New Courses

B2. ENG 2XX Screenwriting for Film, Television and the Internet,

Pg. 49

Course Revisions

B3. PSY 272 Correctional Psychology, Pg. 68

B4. ANT 208 Cities and Culture, Pg. 76

Academic Standards

B5. HIS/GEN 364 Model syllabus, Pg. 78

IV. Report from the Committee on Graduate Studies (attachments C1) – Dean

Domingo

C1. A proposal for a new course in the Criminal Justice Program:

CRJ 7XX Investigation of Violent Crime, Pg. 80

V. New Business

VI. Administrative Announcements – President Jeremy Travis

VII. Announcements from the Faculty Senate – Professor Karen Kaplowitz

VIII. Announcements from the Student Council – Ms. Whitney Brown

1

A

JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE

The City University of New York

MINUTES OF THE COLLEGE COUNCIL

Thursday, September 22 2011

The College Council held its first meeting of the 2011-2012 academic year on Thursday,

September 22, 2011. The meeting was called to order at 1:50 p.m. and the following members

were present: Jeffrey Aikens, Andrea Balis, Whitney Brown, Kinya Chandler, Kathleen Collins,

Lyell Davis, Virginia Diaz, James DiGiovanna, Mathieu Dufour, Jennifer Dysart, Terry Furst,

Laura Greenberg, Maki Haberfeld, Devin Harner, Veronica Hendrick, Berenecea Johnson

Eanes, Shaobai Kan, Karen Kaplowitz, Mehak Kapoor, Kwando Kinshasa, Nilsa Lam, Richard Li,

Yue Ma, Vincent Maiorino, Even Mandery, Marcelle Mauvais, Roger McDonald, Sara

McDougall, Shavonne McKiever, David Munns, Rhonda Nieves, Richard Ocejo, Robert

Pignatello, Carina Quintian, Rick Richardson, Michael Scaduto, Francis Sheehan, Davinder

Singh, Staci Strobl, Patricia Tovar, Denise Thompson, Jeremy Travis, and Michelle Tsang.

Absent were: Zeeshan Ali, Jana Arsovska, Elton Beckett, Mark Benjamin, Jane Bowers, Erica

Burleigh, Demi Cheng, Brian Costa, Jannette Domingo, Lior Gideon, Demis Glasford, Norman

Groner, Richard Haw, Anru Lee, Anne Lopes, Mickey Melendez, Brian Montes, Catherine

Mulder, Jason Nunez, Nicholas Petraco, Nial Rougier, Raul Rubio, Richard Saulnier, and Karen

Terry

Alternates Present: James Cauthen, and DeeDee Falkenbach

I. Adoption of the Agenda

It was moved to adopt the agenda as presented. The motion to approve the new agenda was

seconded and approved unanimously.

II. Minutes of the May 16, 2011 College Council Meeting

It was moved to amend the minutes as presented. Item B6: “Proposal for a New Model of

General Education at John Jay – ‘Education for Justice’” the one vote against, will now

reflect one abstention. The motion was seconded and passed unanimously as amended.

III. Approval of the College Council Committee Members

It was moved to adopt the members with the following revisions:

College Council

Beverly Frazier – should be listed in the department of Law and Police Science

DeeDee Falkenbach – should be listed in the department of Psychology

Jeffrey Aikens – Treasurer, Student Council and member of the Executive Committee of the

College Council.

2

A

Undergraduate Curriculum and Academic Standards Committee

SEEK Department: Nancy Velasquez Torres is replacing Monica Son

Sociology Department: Richard Ocejo is replacing Amy Adamezyk

The motion was seconded and approved unanimously.

IV. Report from the Undergraduate Curriculum and Academic Standards Committee

(attachments C1 – C13)

It was moved to adopt the marked “C1: Letter of Intent for a BA in Sociology.” The motion

was seconded and approved unanimously.

It was moved to adopt the proposal marked “C2: Proposal to revise the BS in Criminal

Justice”. The motion was seconded and approved unanimously.

It was moved to adopt the proposal marked “C3: Proposal for a New Minor in Human

Rights”. The motion was seconded and approved unanimously.

It was moved to adopt the new course proposal marked “C4: Proposal to Revise the Program

& Minor in Dispute Resolution”. The motion was seconded and approved unanimously.

It was moved to adopt the new course proposal marked “C5. SOC 3XX: Evaluation

Research”. The motion was seconded and approved unanimously.

It was moved to adopt the new course proposal marked “C6. CJBS 2XX: Research Methods

and Statistics in Criminal Justice”. The motion was seconded and passed.

In Favor: 44 Opposed: 1 Abstentions: 0

It was moved to adopt the new course proposal marked “C7. CJBS 3XX: Criminal Justice:

Theory to Practice”. The motion was seconded and passed.

It was moved to adopt the new course proposal marked “C8. LAS 4XX: Colloquium on

Research in Law and Society”. The motion was seconded and passed unanimously.

It was moved to adopt the new course proposal marked “C9. ACC/LAW 2XX: Colloquium on

Research in Law and Society”. The motion was seconded and passed unanimously.

It was moved to adopt the new course proposal marked “C10. HIS 2XX: History of World

Slavery to 1650 C.E.”. The motion was seconded and passed unanimously.

It was moved to adopt the new course proposal marked “C11. PSY 3XX: Learning and

Memory”. The motion was seconded and passed unanimously.

It was moved to adopt the new course proposal marked “C12. DRA 3XX: Film Criticism”.

The motion was seconded and passed.

In Favor: 44 Opposed: 0 Abstentions: 1

3

A

It was moved to adopt the course revisions marked C13 –C17 as a package:

C13. PSY 232 Psychology of Adolescence and the Adolescent Offender

C14. PSY 236 Group Dynamics

C15. HIS/GEN 364 History of Gender & Sexuality: Pre-history to 1650

C16. POL 215 Legislative Process

C17. POL 220 The Chief Executive (American Presidency)

The motion was seconded and approved unanimously.

It was moved to accept items marked C13 – C17. The motion was seconded and approved

unanimously.

V. Report from the Committee on Graduate Studies(attachments D1 – D3)

Professor Wulach and Professor Raghavan presented Item D1. It was moved to adopt the

course proposal marked “D1: Proposals for a dual BA/MA degree in Forensic Mental Health

Counseling.” The motion was seconded and approved unanimously.

Professor Lovely presented on item D2. It was moved to adopt the course proposal marked

“D2: Proposal for an Advanced Certificate in Applied Digital Forensic Science”. The motion

was seconded and approved unanimously.

Professor Lovely presented on item D3. It was moved to adopt the new course proposal

marked “D3: Resolution to increase the allowable external credit for Forensic Computing

students in the Forensic Computing Program”. The motion was seconded and approved

unanimously.

VI. 2010-2011 College Council Committee Activity Report

It was moved to add the July 20, 2011 Interim Executive Committee meeting in the 2011-

2012 College Council activity report. The motion was seconded and approved unanimously.

VII. College Council Calendar

It was moved to accept the revised College Council 2011-2012 calendar. The motion was

seconded and approved unanimously.

The meeting was adjourned at 3:10 p.m.

4

B1

Approved by UCASC, September 16, prepared for College Council, October 19, 2011

Queensborough Community College

The City University of New York

PROPOSAL TO ESTABLISH A DUAL/JOINT PROGRAM IN

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTING FOR FORENSIC

ACCOUNTING (QCC) LEADING TO THE

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ECONOMICS (JOHN JAY)

Effective: Fall 2011

Sponsored by the Departments of:

Business: Dr. Jonas Falik, Chair

Queensborough Community College

Economics: Dr. Joan Hoffman, Chair

John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Approved by:

QCC Academic Senate, May 11, 2010

John Jay College Council, ______

Contact persons:

Arthur Corradetti, Ph.D. David P. Barnet, Ph.D.

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Director of Educational Partnerships

Queensborough Community College John Jay College of Criminal Justice

718.631.6350 212.484.1114

acorradetti@qcc.cuny.edu dbarnet@jjay.cuny.edu

____________________________ ________________________

Dr. Karen Steele Dr. Jane P. Bowers

Interim Vice President for Academic Affairs Provost and V.P. for Academic Affairs

Queensborough Community College John Jay College of Criminal Justice

5

2

Table of Contents

Page

Purpose and Goals 3

Need and Justification 3

Forensic Accounting 3

Financial and Ethical Wrong Doing 4

Growth in the Field of Forensic Accounting 5

Underrepresented Groups in the Financial Operations Workforce 6

Student Interest/Enrollment 6

Curriculum 7

Faculty 12

Cost 12

Additional References, Resources, and Web Sites 13

Appendices 14

6

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Approved by UCASC, September 16, prepared for College Council, October 19, 2011

Purpose and Goals

Queensborough Community College (QCC) and John Jay College of Criminal Justice propose to

offer an Associate in Science (A.S.) degree in Accounting for Forensic Accounting as a jointly

registered, dual admission program with the existing Bachelor of Science in Economics: Forensic

Financial Analysis (B.S.) at John Jay College of Criminal Justice (John Jay). Upon successful

completion of the lower division at QCC, students will have a seamless transition to the upper

division of the baccalaureate program at John Jay. The dual/joint program will offer increased

educational opportunities for Hispanics, African Americans, Asians and other underrepresented

minorities in the forensic accounting field who might otherwise be denied access to higher

education. The collegial nature of the program will facilitate the transition to the professional portion

of the curriculum. This proposed program addresses a recommendation of the Spellings Commission

Report: “We want postsecondary institutions to adapt to a world altered by technology, changing

demographics and globalization, in which the higher-education landscape includes new providers

and new paradigms, from for-profit universities to distance learning.”1

The proposed program will afford Queensborough Community College graduates, most of whom are

minority students and are traditionally underrepresented as professionals in management, business,

and financial operations occupations, the opportunity and encouragement to succeed in these fields.

Need and Justification

Several factors have driven this program’s development. First, according to the Bureau of Labor

Statistics, the demand for individuals with an accounting background is expected to increase faster

than average through 20162. With the increasing number of white collar crimes, there is growing

demand for individuals who have additional expertise in the detection and prevention of fraud and

other financial crimes. Second, in spite of numerous organizations and committees whose mission is

to encourage and assist minority entrance in accounting fields, Hispanics, African-Americans and

Asians are still underrepresented in management, business, and financial operations occupations.

Third, the Hispanic population nationwide is now estimated at 12.6%3 but the percentage of

Hispanics enrolled at QCC in the Fall of 2009 was 25.94%4, the African-American population

nationwide is now estimated at 12.3%3 but the percentage of African-Americans enrolled at QCC in

the Fall of 2009 was 26.44%4 and the Asian population nationwide is now estimated at 3.6%3 but the

percentage of Asians enrolled at QCC in the Fall of 2009 was 23.87%4. This proposed program will

provide QCC students with the ability to prepare for a baccalaureate degree program in forensic

accounting and seek employment in management, business, and financial operations occupations.

Forensic Accounting

Forensic accountants are specially trained to identify evidence of fraud, investigate fraud, provide

litigation support, and to prevent fraud. The education required combines knowledge of principles of

accounting and finance, law and investigation techniques and theories of criminology and ethics.

1 Report of the Commission Appointed by Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings., “A TEST OF LEADERSHIP Charting the

Future of U.S. Higher Education”, September, 2006.

2 Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2008-09 Edition, Accountants and

Auditors, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos001.htm (visited 12/12/08).

3 http://factfinder.census.gov

4 http://www.qcc.cuny.edu/OIRA/OIRADocs/Factbook10/B.pdf

7

B1

Approved by UCASC, September 16, prepared for College Council, October 19, 2011

The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) which has been in existence since 1988 and

currently has more than 20,000 members world-wide established a Certified Fraud Examiner (CFE)

credential to provide individuals with evidence of expertise in the identification and prevention of

fraud. The demand for accountants with this expertise has increased dramatically. With the growing

problems on Wall Street, firms are hiring forensic accountants to uncover financial and ethical

irregularities, determine who is responsible and assess asset misappropriation and resulting

economic damages. This increase in demand has been corroborated by a recent survey conducted by

the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). The results were reported at the

2008 AICPA National Accounting Conference on Fraud and Litigation Services: “Sixty-eight

percent of the 5,400 members of the AICPA’s Forensic Valuation Services Section who were polled

say their forensic practices have grown over the past year. Of those respondents who reported

increased demand, 67 percent cited computation of economic damages as the leading reason,

followed by marital disputes (56 percent), and investigations of financial statement fraud (54

percent).”5 Further evidence of the growing need is that the AICPA announced at the conference that

it will offer a new credential, Certified in Financial Forensics.

Financial and Ethical Wrong Doing

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) maintains a division exclusively dedicated to

investigating and prosecuting white collar crime. “The FBI investigates white-collar criminal

activities, such as money laundering, securities and commodities fraud, bank fraud and

embezzlement, environmental crimes, fraud against the government, health care fraud, election law

violations, copyright violations, and telemarketing fraud. In general, the FBI focuses on organized

crime activities that are international, national, or regional in scope where the FBI can bring to bear

unique expertise or capabilities that increase the likelihood of a successful investigation and

prosecution. In the health care fraud area, the FBI targets systemic abuses, such as large-scale billing

fraud that is national or regional in scope and fraudulent activities that threaten the safety of patients.

The FBI pursues financial institution fraud involving $100,000 or more. In cases of telemarketing

and insurance fraud, the FBI will generally become involved when there is evidence of nationwide

or international activities. The number of agents investigating corporate and other securities,

commodities, and investment fraud cases has increased 47 percent, from 177 in 2001 to more than

250 today. Since 2007, there have been more than 1,700 pending corporate, securities, commodities,

and investment fraud cases, an increase of 37 percent since 2001.”6

In the last six years, the number of suspicious activity reports alleging mortgage fraud that have been

filed with the Treasury Department has increased nearly tenfold- more than 62,000 reports were filed

in 2008. Over the past three years, the number of criminal mortgage fraud investigations opened by

the FBI has more than doubled to 1,800 and the FBI anticipates that a new wave of investigations

could potentially double that number yet again in the next few years… On May 20, 2009, President

Obama signed into law the Fraud Enforcement and Recovery Act of 2009 (“FERA”). FERA

provides government agencies with increased funding and more stringent legislation with which to

5 Demand for Forensic Accountants Step, WebCPA Staff,

http://www.webcpa.com/articleid=29607&searchTerm=forensic%20accounting, Nov. 1, 2008.

6 http://www.fbi.gov/facts_and_figures/investigative_programs.htm

8

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Approved by UCASC, September 16, prepared for College Council, October 19, 2011

combat financial and mortgage fraud… With this funding, the FBI will be able to hire 190 additional

special agents and more than 200 professional staff and forensic analysts, which will nearly double

the size of its financial fraud program and enable it to expand the number of its mortgage fraud task

forces from 26 to more than 50.”7

Growth in the Field of Forensic Accounting

The outlook for accountants, in general, and especially for those with a forensic background is

excellent. According to the latest edition of the Occupational Outlook Handbook: “Employment of

accountants and auditors is expected to grow by 18 percent between 2006 and 2016, which is faster

than the average for all occupations. This occupation will have a very large number of new jobs

arise, almost 226,000 over the projections decade. Changing financial laws and corporate

governance regulations, and increased accountability for protecting an organization’s stakeholders

will drive growth. Increased focus on and numbers of financial crimes such as embezzlement,

bribery, and securities fraud will increase the demand for forensic accountants to detect illegal

financial activity by individuals, companies, and organized crime rings”.8

In particular, employment prospects for the New York City region through 2014 for occupations

related to the academic preparation offered by this proposed joint degree program are considered

very favorable. As can be seen from the table below, the financial management occupations all

require a minimum of a bachelor’s degree which provides additional rationale for QCC to

collaborate with John Jay to offer this joint degree. Further, John Jay’s program at the upper division

states that “graduates will meet the educational requirements and will have covered all four parts

tested by the CFE exam; Criminology & Ethics, Financial Transactions & Fraud Schemes, Legal

Elements of Fraud and Fraud Investigation.”9

NEW YORK STATE

Job Title Employment

Prospects

Median

Wage

Annual

Average

Openings

Training Time Standard

Occupational

Code

Accountants and auditors Very

Favorable

$72,013 3,230 Bachelor’s 13-2011

Compliance Officers Very

Favorable

$61,540 390 Bachelor’s 13-1072

Financial analysts Very

Favorable

$90,400 780 Bachelor’s 13-2051

Financial managers Very

Favorable

n/a 1,260 Bachelor’s 11-3031

Business operations

specialists, all other

Very

Favorable

$68,530 570 Bachelor’s 13-1199

Personal Financial Advisors Very

Favorable

$119,100 650 Bachelor’s 13-2052

7 http://www.ccsb.com/pdf/publications/securitiesupdates/fraud_enforcement_and_recovery_act.pdf

8 Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2008-09 Edition, Accountants and

Auditors, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos001.htm (visited December 14, 2008).

9 http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/economics/pdfs/Finanacial%20Analysis%20Brochure.pdf.

9

B1

Approved by UCASC, September 16, prepared for College Council, October 19, 2011

Source: http://www.labor.state.ny.us/workforceindustrydata/descriptor.asp.

10

B1

Approved by UCASC, September 16, prepared for College Council, October 19, 2011

Underrepresented Groups in the Financial Operations Workforce

The American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA), the Association of Latino

Professionals in Finance and Accounting (ALPFA), the National Association of Black Accountants,

and the National Asian American Society of Accountants (NAASA) all have initiatives designed to

encourage and assist minority entrance in accounting fields. In spite of this, Hispanics, African-

Americans, and Asians are still underrepresented in management, business, and financial operations

occupations. The table below provides a comparison of the percent of minority employment in these

fields for 2009.

Occupation

Total

employed

(in

thousands)

Percent of Total

Women

Black or

African

American

Asian Hispanic

or Latino

Management, business & financial

operations occupations 21,529 42.7 7.0 4.9 7.6

Financial managers 1,183 54.7 8.5 6.1 9.1

Management analysts 640 42.8 7.4 4.8 5.0

Accountants and auditors 1.754 61.8 8.0 10.3 6.3

Budget analysts 57 59.3 14.9 9.2 3.6

Financial analysts 94 30.9 5.8 10.3 6.4

Personal financial advisors 400 32.1 6.9 6.4 7.7

Tax examiners, collectors and revenue

agents 74 73.8 15.6 5.7 3.1

Tax preparers 99 65.9 11.8 7.1 10.1

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/cps/cpsaat11.pdf

The job outlook for these occupations is excellent, and a large pool of potential talent remains

untapped. This proposed program seeks to increase the diversity of this field. The business

environment continues to project a critical need for accounting and finance professionals and

accounting firms as well as government organizations report significant demand for individuals with

forensic accounting preparation. In today’s economic climate, forensic accountants are in demand

not just to identify fraud but to help prevent it.10

Student Interest/Enrollment

The A.S. Program in Accounting for Forensic Accounting is designed to attract students who have

an interest in pursuing a career in accounting and who also wish to specialize in Forensic

Accounting. There is a large untapped source of students in the Borough of Queens who can benefit

from this type of program, especially in light of the excellent job outlook. The Queensborough

Office of Admissions will market the proposed program with an aggressive information campaign. It

is anticipated that there will be a web page on the QCC website devoted to the program. The web

10 “Bad times bode well for forensic accounting”, Long Island Business News.10/24/2008.

11

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Approved by UCASC, September 16, prepared for College Council, October 19, 2011

page will include a curriculum outline, employment outlook information, a FAQ list and if possible,

testimonials from recent graduates of John Jay’s Bachelor of Science in Economics (B.S.). In

addition, QCC should take every step necessary to ensure that every incoming student with an

interest in Accounting is made aware of the program. Every student enrolled in an Accounting

course should be given a flyer with a description of the program. The flyer could be distributed on

the first day of class along with other course material, or possibly incorporated in the course syllabi.

A survey conducted in February 2010 among accounting students at QCC showed overwhelming

interest in this dual/joint program. The survey was administered to all QCC students enrolled in the

core accounting courses for majors. The questionnaire included a half-page description of the

program along with a list of the Freshman and Sophomore year required course sequences at

Queensborough Community College (60 Credits). The questionnaire asked students if they would be

interested in the program. Out of the total 135 responses, 96 of the respondents expressed interest in

the program. We also expect the marketing of the program at both major recruitment functions and

on the Queensborough website will result in an increase in transfer students to Queensborough.

Finally, we expect that this program will be popular among students currently enrolled at

Queensborough and anticipate a slight shift of other majors to this program.

Projected Student Enrollment

PROJECTED ENROLLMENT Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

Percentage new 10% 30% 50% 80% 100%

1. Full Time Students 40 51 60 66 72

2. Part Time Students 25 34 40 44 48

3. Total Students 65 85 100 110 120

Note: the projected ratio of full-time to part-time is 60%. The fall 2009 enrollment at Queensborough (an unusually

large enrollment) was approximately 62% full time.

Curriculum

The proposed Associate in Science degree in Accounting for Forensic Accounting consists of

courses which allow students to pursue further education and careers in forensic accounting,

accounting, auditing, as well as financial operations and management fields. The proposed program

will allow students to enter the upper division baccalaureate program in Economics: Forensic

Financial Analysis at John Jay. The curriculum emphasizes basic accounting principles and provides

a foundation in business organization and management. The program meets the general education

requirements for the Associate degree at Queensborough Community College and also meets the

general education requirements for the Baccalaureate degree at John Jay College.

12

B1

Approved by UCASC, September 16, prepared for College Council, October 19, 2011

QCC/JJ DUAL /JOINT DEGREE PROGRAM: A.S. IN ACCOUNTING (QCC) AND B.S. IN ECONOMICS:

FORENSIC FINANCIAL ANALYSIS (JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE)

QCC A.S. ACCOUNTING CR. JJC EQUIVALENTS CR.

General Education Core General Education Core

EN 101 English Composition I

EN 102 English Composition II

3

3

ENG 101 College Composition I

ENG 201 College Composition II

3

3

HI 110 Ancient Civilization OR

HI 111 Medieval to Early Modern Civilization,

OR HI 112 Modern Civilization

3

HIS 203 Global History: Prehistory to 500

CE

HIS 204: 500 – 1650

HIS 205: 1650 –Present

3

MA 440 Pre-calculus Mathematics OR

MA-441 Analytical Geometry and Calculus I MA

260 Pre-calculus and Elements of Calculus for

Business Students

4 MAT 141 Pre-calculus OR

MAT 241 Calculus I

3 +

1bl

LAB SCIENCE 4 LAB SCIENCE 4

FOREIGN LANGUAGE and/or Liberal Arts and

Sciences (If not exempted by QCC policy or if

satisfaction of requirement not to be deferred to

junior and/or senior year at John Jay) 1

6-8 FOREIGN LANGUAGE (Or courses

chosen from set found at footnote 1 below)

6

SP 211 Speech Communication 3 SPE 113 Speech Communication 3

SS 310 Sociology 3 SOC 101 Introductory Sociology 3

SS-410 Amer. Gov’t and Politics OR

CJ-102 Criminology 3

POL 101 American Gov’t & Politics OR

SOC 203 Criminology 3

General Education Subtotal 32-34 Subtotal toward JJ Gen. Ed. Core 32

Requirements for the Major Requirements for the Major

BU 101 Principles of Accounting 4 ECO 250 Introduction to Accounting 3 + 1

bl

BU 102 Principles of Accounting II 4 ECO 251 Introduction to Managerial

Accounting

3 + 1

bl

BU 203 Principles of Statistics 3 STA 250 Principles and Methods of Statistics 3

BU-103 Intermediate Accounting I 4 Economics 200 Level Elective 4

BU-108 Income Taxation OR BU-111 Computer

Applications in Accounting

3 Economics 200 Level Elective 3

CJ 101 Intro to Criminal Justice 3 CRJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3

SS 211 Macroeconomics or SS 212

Microeconomics

3 SS- 211 = ECO 220 Macroeconomics

SS 212 = ECO 101 Principles of Economics

3

Accounting Major Subtotal 24 Subtotal toward Major 24

Electives

Recommended: Liberal Arts and Science other

than History and one Physical Education course

2-4 Elective toward the major or toward general

education

4

TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR A.S. 60 TOTAL CREDITS ACCEPTED TO JJ 60

Note: Students must take two Writing Intensive (WI) courses to receive the Associate Degree from Queensborough.

1 Students who do not need to take a foreign language, or who decide to take their foreign language at John Jay, are recommended to

take the following:

13

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Approved by UCASC, September 16, prepared for College Council, October 19, 2011

QCC COURSES Credits JJC EQUIVALENTS Credits

SS 211 Macroeconomics or SS 212

Microeconomics (Either counts toward

major)

3 ECO 220 Macroeconomics or ECO

101 Principles of Economics

3

CJ 102 Criminology OR SS-410

American Govt. & Politics

3 SOC 203 Criminology OR POL 101

American Govt. & Politics

3

Humanities, History or Social Sciences

electives

3-6 3-6

JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEAR COURSES TO BE TAKEN AT JOHN JAY

Course and Title Credits

General Education (Liberal arts, Core, Distribution) and other Required Courses

PHI 231 or LIT 230, 231, 232, 233 3

Foreign Language (students who have met the foreign languages requirement may take other liberal arts

and sciences electives)

6

Liberal Arts and Sciences electives 6 – 15

Subtotal 21

Prerequisite and Major Courses

ECO 220 Macroeconomics (Unless SS 212 Macroeconomics, was taken at QCC 3

ECO 225 Microeconomics 3

Law 202 Law and Evidence 3

Students who did not take both American Government and Politics and Criminology at Queensborough

must take one or the other at John Jay.

0 – 3

Specialization C: Forensic Financial Analysis

ACC 307 Forensic Accounting I 3

ACC 308 Auditing 3

ACC 309 Forensic Accounting II 3

Two elective courses from Specialization in Forensic Financial Analysis:

Accounting 265 Digital Forensics for the Fraud Examiner

Economics 215 Economics of Regulation and the Law

Economics 235 Finance for Forensic Economics

Economics 360/Sociology 360 Corporate and White Collar Crime

Law 203 Constitutional Law or, pending final approval, Law 2xx Business Law

6

Capstone:

ACC 410 Seminar in Forensic Financial Analysis 3

Subtotal 27

Electives 12

TOTAL CREDITS AT JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE 60

Total Degree credits for the Bachelor of Science in Economics: Forensic Financial Analysis – 120

14

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Approved by UCASC, September 16, prepared for College Council, October 19, 2011

FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEAR COURSE SEQUENCES AT QUEENSBOROUGH COMMUNITY

COLLEGE (60 CREDITS)

FRESHMAN YEAR: FALL FRESHMAN YEAR: SPRING

COURSE TITLE Credits COURSE TITLE Credits

MA 440, MA 441, or MA 260 Pre-

Calculus or Analytical Geo & Calc I

4 EN 102 English Composition II 3

BU 101 Principles of Accounting 4 SS 310 Sociology 3

EN 101 English Composition I 3 BU 102 Principles of Accounting II 4

CJ 101 Intro to Criminal Justice 3 SS 211 Macroeconomics or SS 212

Microeconomics

3

SP 211 Speech Communication 3 HI 110 Intr. to Anc. Civs. or HI 111

Intr. Med-Ear. M. W. or HI 112 Intr.

Mod. Wes. Civ.

3

Total Credits 17 Total Credits 16

SOPHOMORE YEAR: FALL SOPHOMORE YEAR: SPRING

COURSE TITLE Credits COURSE TITLE Credits

BU 108 Income Taxation or

BU 111 Computer Applications in

Accounting

3 Foreign language or Liberal Arts and

Sciences or SS 410 American

Government and Politics or CJ 102

Criminology

3-4

BU 103 Intermediate Accounting I 4 Lab Science 4

BU 203 Principles of Statistics 3 Electives

(BU 108, BU 111 or BU 104

recommended) or a Humanities,

History or Social Sciences elective and

one Physical Education Course

2-4

Foreign language or Liberal Arts and

Sciences

3-4 SS410 American Government and

Politics or CJ 102 Criminology

3

Total Credits 13-14 Total Credits 12-15

Total credits required for A.S. in Accounting for Forensic Accounting 60

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JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEAR COURSE SEQUENCES TO BE TAKEN AT JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF

CRIMINAL JUSTICE (60 CREDITS) – SAMPLE PROGRAM

JUNIOR YEAR: FALL JUNIOR YEAR: SPRING

COURSE TITLE Credits COURSE TITLE Credits

ACC 307 Forensic Accounting I 3 ACC 308 Auditing 3

ECO 220 Macroeconomics 3 ECO 225 Microeconomics 3

Foreign Language or Liberal Arts

Elective 2

3 LAW 202 Law and Evidence 3

PHI 231 Knowing, Being and Doing 3 Foreign Language or Liberal Arts

Elective 2

3

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3

Total Credits 15 Total Credits 15

SENIOR YEAR: FALL SENIOR YEAR: SPRING

COURSE TITLE Credits COURSE TITLE Credits

ACC 309 Forensic Accounting II 3 ACC 410 Seminar in Forensic Financial

Analysis

3

Elective course from Category C 3 Elective course from Category C 3

Liberal Arts Electives 3 Liberal Arts Electives 3

Free Electives 6 Free Electives 6

Total Credits 15 Total Credits 15

Total credits to be taken at John Jay College 60

TOTAL CREDITS FOR THE DUAL / JOINT A.S. IN ACCOUNTING (QCC)/ B.S. IN ECONOMICS:

FORENSIC FINANCIAL ANALYSIS (JJC)

120

2 Students who have fulfilled John Jay’s foreign languages requirement may take a Liberal Arts Elective.

C. Economics Specialization in Forensic Financial Analysis (two courses must be selected):

Accounting 265 Digital Forensics for the Fraud Examiner

Economics 215 Economics of Regulation and the Law

Economics 235 Finance for Forensic Economics

Economics 360/Sociology 360 Corporate and White Collar Crime

Law 203 Constitutional Law or, pending final approval, Law 2xx Business Law

Note: Liberal Arts and Sciences is highlighted in yellow

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Faculty

No additional faculty will be needed for the proposed program. The current Queensborough

Community College faculty already teaches the courses that represent the general and curriculum

requirements in the proposed program. As the program grows, some additional adjunct sections

may be needed.

Cost

There are minimal additional facilities or equipment costs associated with this program.

Queensborough Community College has state-of-the-art computer laboratories already equipped

with hardware and software that will support this program. Normal ongoing computer and software

updates would be made for the courses already being taught at QCC. Library

Library and Instructional Materials

Library services at QCC include information literacy instruction that is customized for course

content and assignments. Reference librarians are on duty whenever the library is open and Library

databases are available from off-campus at all times. We expect to offer reference assistance to offcampus

students either by email or instant messaging by fall.

In order to improve our ability to assist Accounting students, the Library’s liaison to the Business

Department has met with other CUNY librarians at Baruch to discuss library work with accounting

students, and the Electronic Resources Librarian will be meeting with Baruch library faculty to learn

about their electronic resources for accounting.

Through CUNY, the College has access to several databases (Business Source Premier, Business

and Company Resource Center) that will be helpful for this program. The Library continues to

maintain an up-to-date book collection and welcome the recommendations of all faculty members.

We should add Criminal Justice Abstracts ($3200). It would be useful for this program and for the

Criminal Justice Joint Degree program that is already in place.

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Additional References

 Careers in Accounting. Accounting: Facts & Trends. Retrieved January 27, 2007, from

http://www.carrers-in-accounting.com/acfacts.htm

 CNNMoney. Working your degree: Accounting majors have the kind of job flexibility most

of us only dream about. Retrieved January 27, 2007, from

http://www.money.cnn.com/2000/09/22/career/q_degreeaccounting/

 Salary Estimates. CareerJournal.com [The Wall Street Journal Executive Career Site].

Retrieved April 22, 2007, from http://salaryexpert.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=free_Salary

 Sanders, B. & Romeo, L. B. (2005). The supply of accounting graduates and the demand for

public accounting recruits – 2005 – For academic year 2003 -2004. New York, NY:

American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, Inc.

 Siegel, Gary & Sorensen, James. (2006). What corporate America wants in entry-level

accountants: Executive summary. New York, NY: Institute of Management Accountants.

 Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook,

2008-09 Edition.

 Hiring Boom on the Horizon for CFEs. September/October 2009 issue of Fraud Magazine.

 A Help-Wanted Sign for Fraud Investigators. NYTimes.Com.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/22/jobs/22fraud.html?_r=2&scp=1&sq=A%20help%20

Additional Accounting Information Resources

 Accounting Today. (212) 371-9400. Bi-weekly publication that provides excellent coverage

of important trends in the accounting profession.

 Accounting Workshop. An online resource that lists information and tips for accounting

students. Available at: http://www.johnwiley.com

 AICPA – “Takin’Care of Business.” Informative site on careers in accounting. Available at:

http://www.startHereGoPlaces.com

 CPA Journal. (212) 973-8300. Monthly journal provides information of general interest to

CPAs and activities at the major public accounting firms.

 Journal of Accountancy. (212) 575-6200. Leading accounting monthly covering the

accounting profession and job listings.

 Management Accounting – Official Magazine of the Institute of Management Accountants.

(201) 573-9000. Includes a section on career management and discusses trends in the

accounting profession.

 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners: http://www.acfe.com/.

 American Institute of Certified Public Accountants: http://www.aicpa.org/.

Related Sites

http://www.Accountingjobs.com

 htpp://www.Tax-jobs.com

 htpp://www.Accounting.com

 htpp://www.CNNfn.com (Salary Sample for accountants)

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Appendices

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Appendix A:

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR REQUIRED COURSES

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BU 101 Principles of Accounting I

4 credits

Accounting concepts and conventions; accounting tools and techniques, including records and

statements; general and special journals; general and subsidiary ledgers; controlling accounts,

adjusting and closing entries; worksheets and financial statements; systems and controls (including

payroll system).

BU 102 Principles of Accounting II

4 credits

PREREQ: BU101 WITH A GRADE OF C- OR BETTER

Partnership, corporation, departmental, branch, and manufacturing accounting covering:

organization; operations; equity; earnings; dividends; long-term obligations; investments;

preparation and analysis of various financial statements, including Statement of Cash Flows; and the

use of accounting in the solution of managerial problems and decision-making.

BU 103 Intermediate Accounting I

4 credits

PREREQ: BU102 WITH A GRADE OF C OR BETTER

Review of basic accounting concepts, procedures, and financial statements, including the Statement

of Cash Flows; the principles of accounting applied to special problems involving cash, receivables,

inventories, current liabilities, stockholders’ equity, including earnings per share.

BU 108 Income Taxation

3 credits

PREREQ: BU102

Comprehensive analysis of basic income tax principles as they affect individuals, partnerships, and

corporations; application of the tax concepts of gross income, adjusted gross income, taxable

income, exemptions, deductions, and credits as interpreted under the Internal Revenue Code,

regulations, and court decisions; extensive hands-on laboratory practice in preparation of tax returns

and forms with professional level software packages; comparison with New York State laws.

BU 111 Computer Applications in Accounting

3 credits

A review of business applications currently used to enhance the productivity of the accountant. The

student is expected to be able to apply new tools, such as electronic spreadsheets, integrated

accounting, and data base management, to solve selected business problems through hands-on

experience in a microcomputer laboratory.

BU 203 Principles of Statistics

3 credits

PREREQ: MA128, OR MA260 OR MA321 OR MA440

An introduction to statistical methods and statistical reasoning; nature and scope of statistical

inquiries; collection and presentation of data; descriptive methods with particular reference to

frequency distributions, correlation, index numbers and time series analysis; elements of probability,

sampling methods, sampling error and principles of estimation.

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CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice

3 credits

PREREQ: BE122 OR BE226 OR SATISFACTORY SCORE ON THE CUNY/ACT READING ASSESSMENT TEST

OR EXEMPTION FROM NYS ENGLISH REGENTS, SAT VERBAL, BACHELORS DEGREE OR APPROPRIATE

TRANSFER CREDIT.

A survey of the institutions and processes of the criminal justice system. Special emphasis on police,

courts, and corrections.

SS 211 Introduction to Macroeconomics

3 credits

PREREQ: BE122 OR BE226 OR SATISFACTORY SCORE ON THE CUNY/ACT READING ASSESSMENT TEST

OR EXEMPTION FROM NYS ENGLISH REGENTS, SAT VERBAL, BACHELORS DEGREE OR APPROPRIATE

TRANSFER CREDIT.

A study of factors determining national output, income, employment, and prices; the impact of

government spending, taxation, and monetary policy; the banking system; economic growth;

international trade.

SS 212 Introduction to Microeconomics

3 credits

PREREQ: BE122 OR BE226 OR SATISFACTORY SCORE ON THE CUNY/ACT READING ASSESSMENT TEST

OR EXEMPTION FROM NYS ENGLISH REGENTS, SAT VERBAL, BACHELORS DEGREE OR APPROPRIATE

TRANSFER CREDIT.

A study of the determination of prices and the distribution of income under various market

conditions; government intervention in the market; a comparison of different types of economic

systems.

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Appendix B:

PROGRAM CONTENT AND REQUIREMENTS

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Program Content and Requirements Please place an x in the

appropriate column

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 MOST UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE TITLES REQUIRE A SPECIFIED PERCENTAGE OF

LIBERAL ARTS CONTENT (FOR EXAMPLE, AA, BA REQUIRE 75%; AS, BS, BSED REQUIRE

Course Number and Course Title No. of

Credits

Is this a

new

course?

Is this a

revised

course?

List each course

required for the

college core (if

applicable)

EN 101, EN 102 English Composition I, II 6 No No

SP 211 Speech Communication 3 No No

HI 110 or 111 or 112 3 No No

SS 310 Sociology 3 No No

SS 410 American Gov’t. and Politics or CJ 102

Criminology 3 No No

Foreign Language or Liberal Arts and

Sciences and up to one credit hour of Physical

Education

6-8 No No

Lab Science 4 No No

MA 440, MA 441, or MA 260 Pre-Calc, or Anal

Geometry & Calc I, or Elem Calc for Business 4 No No

General Education Core subtotal 32-34

List each course

required for the

major (include any

field experience,

research, thesis, or

capstone course)

BU 101 Principles of Accounting 4 No No

BU 102 Principles of Accounting II 4 No No

BU 103 Intermediate Accounting I 4 No No

BU 108 Income Taxation or BU 111 Computer

Applications in Accounting 3 No No

BU 203 Principles of Statistics 3 No No

CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 No No

SS 211 Macroeconomics or SS 212

Microeconomics 3 No No

Major Requirements subtotal 24

List each free

electives

BU 108, BU 111, or BU104 Intermediate

Accounting II or a Humanities, History or

Social Sciences elective and one Physical

Education course

2-4 No No

Free Electives subtotal 2-4

Total credits 60

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Approved by UCASC, September 16, prepared for College Council, October 19, 2011

50%; AAS REQUIRES 33%). WITHIN THE TABLE, IDENTIFY WITH AN ASTERISK ALL

COURSES THAT ARE CONSIDERED LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES

Appendix C:

PROGRAM SCHEDULING

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Table for semester programs

FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEAR COURSE SEQUENCES AT QUEENSBOROUGH COMMUNITY

COLLEGE (60 CREDITS)

FRESHMAN YEAR: FALL FRESHMAN YEAR: SPRING

COURSE TITLE Credits COURSE TITLE Credits

MA 440, MA 441, or MA 260 4 EN 102 English Composition II 3

BU 101 Principles of Accounting 4 SS 310 Sociology 3

EN 101 English Composition I 3 BU 102 Principles of Accounting II 4

CJ 101 Intro to Criminal Justice 3 SS 211 Macroeconomics or SS 212

Microeconomics

3

SP 211 Speech Communication 3 HI 110 Intr. to Anc. Civs. or HI 111

Intr. Med-Ear. M. W. or HI 112 Intr.

Mod. Wes. Civ.

3

Total Credits 17 Total Credits 16

SOPHOMORE YEAR: FALL SOPHOMORE YEAR: SPRING

COURSE TITLE Credits COURSE TITLE Credits

BU 108 Income Taxation or BU 111

Computer Applications in

Accounting

3 Foreign language or Liberal Arts and

Sciences or SS 410 American

Government and Politics or CJ 102

Criminology

3-4

BU 103 Intermediate Accounting I 4 Lab Science 4

BU 203 Principles of Statistics 3 Electives

(BU 108, BU 111 or BU 104

recommended) or a Humanities,

History or Social Sciences elective

and one Physical Education Course

2-4

Foreign language or Liberal Arts and

Sciences

3-4 SS410 American Government and

Politics or CJ 102 Criminology

3

Total Credits 13-14 Total Credits 12-15

Total credits required for A.S. in Accounting for Forensic Accounting 60

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Appendix D:

FACULTY TEACHING ASSIGNMENTS

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26

FACULTY

Course Title (a) No. of

Credits (b)

Faculty Member(s)

Assigned to Each Course.

(Use “D” to Specify

Program Director) (c)

Highest Earned Degree & Discipline, College or

University (d)

Relevant

Occupational

Experience (e)

Relevant other experience (such

as certification/ licensure) (f)

Recent Scholarly

Contributions

(optional below

baccalaureate level)

(g)

BU 101 Principles of

Accounting 4

Shele Bannon

Glen Burdi

Mona Seiler

Kelly Ford

Christina Tucker Manzo

Ben Milchman

Sebastian Murolo

Vicki Kasomenakis

M.B.A. Pace University

M.B.A. St. John’s University

M.B.A. Bernard M. Baruch College

M.B.A. Molloy College

M.B.A. St. John’s University

M.B.A. Bernard M. Baruch College

M.B.A. New York Institute of Technology

M.S. C.W. Post Center of Long Island University

C.P.A. State of New York

C.P.A. State of New York

C.P.A. State of New York

C.P.A. State of New York

C.P.A. State of New York

C.P.A. State of New York

C.P.A. State of New York

C.P.A. State of New York

BU 102 Principles of

Accounting II 4

Ben Milchman

Mona Seiler

Christina Tucker Manzo

Vicki Kasomenakis

James Rosa

Kathleen Villani

Sebastian Murolo

Shele Bannon

Kelly Ford

M.B.A. Bernard M. Baruch College

M.B.A. Bernard M. Baruch College

M.B.A. St. John’s University

M.S. C.W. Post Center of Long Island University

M.B.A. St. John’s University

M.B.A. Hofstra University

M.B.A. New York Institute of Technology

M.B.A. Pace University

M.B.A. Molloy College

C.P.A. State of New York

C.P.A. State of New York

C.P.A. State of New York

C.P.A. State of New York

C.P.A. State of New York

C.P.A. State of New York

C.P.A. State of New York

C.P.A. State of New York

C.P.A. State of New York

BU 203 Principles of

Statistics 3

Jonas Falik

Angela Poulakidas

Edward Volchok

Ph.D. New York University

M.S. Thunderbird American Graduate School of

International Management

Ph.D. Columbia University

BU 103 Intermediate

Accounting I 4 James Rosa

Kelly Ford

M.B.A. St. John’s University

M.B.A. Molloy College

C.P.A. State of New York

C.P.A. State of New York

BU 108 Income Taxation 3 James Rosa

Sebastian Murolo

M.B.A. St. John’s University

M.B.A. New York Institute of Technology

C.P.A. State of New York

C.P.A. State of New York

BU 111 Computer

Applications in Accounting 3 Kathleen Villani

Shele Bannon

M.B.A. Hofstra University

M.B.A. Pace University C.P.A. State of New York

CJ 101 Introduction to

Criminal Justice 3 Jane Poulsen

Rose-Marie Aikas

Ph.D. New York University

M.A. Rutgers University

SS 211 Macroeconomics 3

Pellegrino Manfra

Caf Dowlah

Paul Azrak

Ph.D. Fordham University

Ph.D. University of Southern California

Ph.D. Fordham University

SS 212 Microeconomics 3

Paul Azrak

Pellegrino Manfra

Caf Dowlah

Ph.D. Fordham University

Ph.D. Fordham University

Ph.D. University of Southern California

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Approved by UCASC, September 16, prepared for College Council, October 19, 2011

Faculty Assignment

Faculty Member Title of Position

at Institution

Full-time (FT) or Adjunct

(Adj.) at the Institution

Full-time (FT) or Part-time (PT) in

the Program

If Part-time in the Program, Specify Other Course Responsibilities

Titles of Courses Taught Which Are Not Part of the

Program Related Credits

Shele Bannon

Glen Burdi

Mona Seiler

Kelly Ford

Christina Tucker Manzo

Ben Milchman

Sebastian Murolo

Vicki Kasomenakis

Assistant Prof.

Assistant Prof.

Professor

Assistant Prof.

Assistant Prof.

Associate Prof.

Instructor

Assistant Prof.

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Ben Milchman

Mona Seiler

Christina Tucker Manzo

Vicki Kasomenakis

James Rosa

Kathleen Villani

Sebastian Murolo

Shele Bannon

Kelly Ford

Associate Prof.

Professor

Assistant Prof.

Assistant Prof.

Professor

Professor

Instructor

Assistant Prof.

Assistant Prof.

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Jonas Falik

Angela Poulakidas

Edward Volchok

Professor

Instructor

Assistant Prof.

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

James Rosa

Kelly Ford

Professor

Assistant Prof.

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

James Rosa

Sebastian Murolo

Kathleen Villani

Professor

Instructor

Professor

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Jane Poulsen Assistant Prof. Full-time Full-time

Pellegrino Manfra

Caf Dowlah

Associate Prof.

Assistant Prof.

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Paul Azrak

Pellegrino Manfra

Caf Dowlah

Professor

Associate Prof.

Assistant Prof.

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

Full-time

31

28

FACULTY TO BE HIRED

Not applicable

32

26

Appendix E:

NEW RESOURCES

33

27

New Resources

Expenditures

2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16

Academic Year2 Academic Year† Academic Year† Academic Year† Academic Year†

Full Time Faculty 0 0 0 0 0

Part Time Faculty 8,415 35,640 66,825 116,325 158,400

Full Time Staff 0 0 0 0 0

Part Time Staff 0 0 0 0 0

Library (Includes Staffing)

0 0 0 0 0

Equipment

0 0 0 0 0

Laboratories

0 0 0 0 0

Supplies & Expenses

(Other than Personnel Services) 1,300 1,300 1,300 1,300 1,300

Capital Expenditures 0 0 0 0 0

Other

3,200 3,200 3,200 3,200 3,200

Total all 12,915 40,140 71,325 120,825 162,900

[1] Specify the inflation rate used for projections.

[2] Specify the academic year.

[3] Include fringe benefits.

[4] New resources means resources

engendered by the proposed program.

[5] Specify what is included in “other” category,

(e.g.,student financial aid).

34

28

Appendix F:

Projected Revenue

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36

30

Projected Revenue

Revenues[1]

1st Year 2nd Year 3rd Year 4th Year 5th Year

Academic Year[2] Academic Year† Academic Year† Academic Year† Academic Year†

Tuition Revenue[3]

$133,800 $162,180 $169,793 $159,181 $159,118

01. From Existing

Sources[4]

02. From New Sources[5] $15,300 $55,998 $112,051 $198,340 $270,175

03. Total $149,100 $218,178 $281,844 $357,521 $429,293

State Revenue[6]

04. From Existing Sources§ $127,063 $124,388 $105,663 $46,813 $0

05. From New Sources** $13,375 $57,513 $108,338 $188,588 $256,800

06. Total $140,438 $181,900 $214,000 $235,400 $256,800

Other Revenue[7]

07. From Existing Sources§ $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

08. From New Sources** $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

09. Total $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Grand Total[8]

10. From Existing Sources§ $260,863 $286,568 $275,456 $205,994 $159,118

11. From New Sources** $28,675 $113,511 $220,389 $386,927 $526,975

TOTAL $289,538 $400,078 $495,844 $592,921 $686,093

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38

32

Appendix G:

Supporting Materials for Projected Revenue

39

33

Supporting Materials for Projected Revenue

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

Direct Operating Expenses

Current Full Time Faculty Replacement Costs

Current Full Time Faculty Overload

New Full Time Faculty Base Salary

New Full Time Faculty Overload (include Summer)

New Faculty Re-assigned Time

Full Time Employee Fringe Benefits (33.0%) 0 0 0 0 0

Total 0 0 0 0 0

Part Time Faculty Actual Salaries 7650 32400 60750 105750 144000

Part Time Faculty Actual Fringe Benefits (10%) 765 3240 6075 10575 14400

Total 8415 35640 66825 116325 158400

Full Time Staff Base Salary

Full Time Staff Fringe Benefits (33%) 0 0 0 0 0

Total 0 0 0 0 0

(DO NOT INCLUDE NEW LIBRARY STAFF IN THIS

SECTION)

Part Time Staff Base Salary

Graduate Assistants

Student Hourly

Part Time Employee Fringe Benefits (10.0%) 0 0 0 0 0

Total (Links to Part-Time Staff on Program Exp

Worksheet) 0 0 0 0 0

LIBRARY

Library Resources

Library Staff Full Time

Full Time Staff Fringe Benefits (33%) 0 0 0 0 0

Library Staff Part Time

Part Time Employee Fringe Benefits (10.0%) 0 0 0 0 0

TOTAL 0 0 0 0 0

EQUIPMENT

Computer Hardware

Office Furniture

Other (Specify)

Total 0 0 0 0 0

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Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

LABORATORIES

Laboratory Equipment

Other (list separately)

TOTAL 0 0 0 0 0

SUPPLIES AND EXPENSES (OTPS)

Consultants and Honoraria

Office Supplies

Instructional Supplies 300 300 300 300 300

Faculty Development

Travel and Conferences

Membership Fees

Advertising and Promotion 500 500 500 500 500

Accreditation

Computer Software

Computer License Fees

Computer Repair and Maintenance 500 500 500 500 500

Equipment Repair and Maintenance

New Total Supplies and OTPS Expenses 1300 1300 1300 1300 1300

CAPITAL EXPENDITURES

Facility Renovations

Classroom Equipment

Other

TOTAL 0 0 0 0 0

Other

Subscription 3200 3200 3200 3200 3200

TOTAL 3200 3200 3200 3200 3200

41

35

Appendix H:

Five-year Financial Projections

42

36

Five-year Financial Projections

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

Tuition & Fees:

Number of Majors (Enter # of EXISTING FULL TIME In

State Students) 35 33 29 13 0

Tuition Income (Specify Rate per credit) calculates 2%

increase per year $3,300 $3,366 $3,433 $3,502 $3,572

Total Tuition $115,500 $111,078 $99,566 $45,526 $0

Student Fees (enter ANNUAL program fees other than

standard CUNY fees)

Total Fees 0 0 0 0 0

Total Instate Tuition & Fees $115,500 $111,078 $99,566 $45,526 $0

Tuition & Fees:

Number of Majors (Enter # of EXISTING FULL TIME

Out of State Students) 1 2 1 0

Tuition Income (Specify Rate per credit) calculates 2%

increase per year $6,600 $6,732 $6,867 $7,004 $7,144

Total Tuition $6,600 $13,464 $6,867 $0 $0

Student Fees (enter ANNUAL program fees other than

standard CUNY fees)

Total Fees 0 0 0 0 0

Total Out of State Tuition & Fees $6,600 $13,464 $6,867 $0 $0

TOTAL EXISTING FULL TIME TUITION REVENUE $122,100 $124,542 $106,433 $45,526 $0

Tuition & Fees:

Number of Majors (Enter # of EXISTING PART-TIME In

State Students) 4 16 29 51 70

Total Enrolled Credits (Enter Avg # credits per student

per year-Fall+ Spring+Summer) i.e. 6 Fall, 6 Spring, 3

Summer=15 15 15 15 15 15

Tuition Income (Specify Rate per credit) calculates 2%

increase per year $140 $143 $146 $149 $152

Total Tuition $8,400 $34,272 $63,360 $113,655 $159,118

Student Fees (enter ANNUAL program fees other than

standard CUNY fees)

Total Fees

Total Instate Tuition & Fees $8,400 $34,272 $63,360 $113,655 $159,118

Tuition & Fees:

Number of Majors (Enter # of EXISTING PART-TIME

Out of State Students) 1 1 0 0 0

Total Enrolled Credits (Enter Avg # credits per student

per year-Fall+ Spring+Summer) i.e. 6 Fall, 6 Spring, 3

Summer=15 15 15 0 0 0

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Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

Tuition Income (Specify Rate per credit) calculates 2%

increase per year $220 $224 $229 $233 $238

Total Tuition $3,300 $3,366 $0 $0 $0

Student Fees (enter ANNUAL program fees other than

standard CUNY fees)

Total Fees 0

Total Out of State Tuition & Fees $3,300 $3,366 $0 $0 $0

TOTAL EXISTING PART TIME REVENUE $11,700 $37,638 $63,360 $113,655 $159,118

TOTAL EXISTING REVENUE (LINKS TO REVENUE

SPREADSHEET ROW 5) $133,800 $162,180 $169,793 $159,181 $159,118

Tuition & Fees:

Number of Majors (Enter # of NEW FULL TIME In State

Students) 4 16 29 51 70

Tuition Income (Specify Rate per credit) calculates 2%

increase per year $3,300 $3,366 $3,433 $3,502 $3,572

Total Tuition $13,200 $53,856 $99,566 $178,601 $250,042

Student Fees (enter ANNUAL program fees other than

standard CUNY fees)

Total Fees 0 0 0 0 0

Total Instate Tuition & Fees $13,200 $53,856 $99,566 $178,601 $250,042

Tuition & Fees:

Number of Majors (Enter # of NEW FULL TIME Out of

State Students) 0 0 1 2 2

Tuition Income (Specify Rate per credit) calculates 2%

increase per year $6,600 $6,732 $6,867 $7,004 $7,144

Total Tuition $0 $0 $6,867 $14,008 $14,288

Student Fees (enter ANNUAL program fees other than

standard CUNY fees)

Total Fees 0 0 0 0 0

Total Out of State Tuition & Fees $0 $0 $6,867 $14,008 $14,288

TOTAL NEW FULL TIME TUITION REVENUE $13,200 $53,856 $106,433 $192,609 $264,330

Tuition & Fees:

Number of Majors (Enter # of NEW PART-TIME In

State Students) 2 11 20 34 47

Total Enrolled Credits (Enter Avg # credits per student

per year-Fall+ Spring+Summer) i.e. 6 Fall, 6 Spring, 3

Summer=15 15 15 15 15 15

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Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

Tuition Income (Specify Rate per credit) calculates 2%

increase per year $140 $143 $146 $149 $152

Total Tuition $2,100 $2,142 $2,185 $2,229 $2,273

Student Fees (enter ANNUAL program fees other than

standard CUNY fees)

Total Fees 0

Total Instate Tuition & Fees $2,100 $2,142 $2,185 $2,229 $2,273

Tuition & Fees:

Number of Majors (Enter # of NEW PART-TIME Out of

State Students) 0 0 1 1 1

Total Enrolled Credits (Enter Avg # credits per student

per year-Fall+ Spring+Summer) i.e. 6 Fall, 6 Spring, 3

Summer=15 0 0 15 15 15

Tuition Income (Specify Rate per credit) calculates 2%

increase per year $220 $224 $229 $233 $238

Total Tuition $0 $0 $3,433 $3,502 $3,572

Student Fees (enter ANNUAL program fees other than

standard CUNY fees)

Total Fees 0 0 0 0 0

Total Out of State Tuition & Fees $0 $0 $3,433 $3,502 $3,572

TOTAL NEW PART TIME REVENUE $2,100 $2,142 $5,618 $5,731 $5,845

TOTAL NEW REVENUE (LINKS TO REVENUE

SPREADSHEET ROW 7) $15,300 $55,998 $112,051 $198,340 $270,175

# CURRENT FTEs (use prorated FTEs for PT Students) 47.5 46.5 39.5 17.5 0

Appropriation per FTE $2,675 $2,675 $2,675 $2,675 $2,675

STATE REVENUE FROM EXISTING SOURCES $127,063 $124,388 $105,663 $46,813 $0

# NEW FTEs 5 21.5 40.5 70.5 96

Appropriation per FTE (FY10) $2,675 $2,675 $2,675 $2,675 $2,675

STATE REVENUE FROM NEW SOURCES $13,375 $57,513 $108,338 $188,588 $256,800

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Appendix I:

STUDENT SURVEY

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Student Interest Survey

Queensborough Community College (QCC) is planning on offering an

Associate in Science (A.S) degree to prepare students for a career in

Forensic Accounting. Forensic accountants are specially trained to identify

evidence of fraud, investigate fraud, provide litigation support and to

prevent fraud. This proposed degree will be a jointly registered, dual

admission program with John Jay College of Criminal Justice’s Bachelor of

Science in Economics: Forensic Financial Analysis (B.S.).

Upon successful completion of the lower division at QCC, students will

have a seamless transition to the upper division of the baccalaureate

program at John Jay.

The following page lists the Freshman and Sophomore year course

sequences at Queensborough Community College (60 Credits)

Would you be interested in this program? Yes No

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FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEAR COURSE SEQUENCES AT

QUEENSBOROUGH COMMUNITY COLLEGE (60 CREDITS)

FRESHMAN YEAR: FALL FRESHMAN YEAR: SPRING

COURSE TITLE Credits COURSE TITLE Credits

MA 440, MA 441, or MA 260 4 EN 102 English Composition II 3

BU 101 Principles of Accounting 4 SS 310 Sociology 3

EN 101 English Composition I 3 BU 102 Principles of Accounting II 4

CJ 101 Intro to Criminal Justice 3 SS 211 Macroeconomics or SS 212

Microeconomics

3

SP 211 Speech Communication 3 HI 110 Intr. to Anc. Civs. or HI 111

Intr. Med-Ear. M. W. or HI 112 Intr.

Mod. Wes. Civ.

3

Total Credits 17 Total Credits 16

SOPHOMORE YEAR: FALL SOPHOMORE YEAR: SPRING

COURSE TITLE Credits COURSE TITLE Credits

BU 108 Income Taxation or BU 111

Computer Applications in

Accounting

3 Foreign language or Liberal Arts and

Sciences

3-4

BU 103 Intermediate Accounting I 4 Lab Science 4

BU 203 Principles of Statistics 3 Electives (BU 108, BU 111 or BU

104 recommended) or see electives

2-4

Foreign language or Liberal Arts and

Sciences and up to one credit hour of

Physical Education

3-4 SS410 Amer. OR CJ 102

Criminology

3

Total Credits 13-14 Total Credits 12-15

Total credits to be taken at Queensborough Community College 60

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JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE

The City University of New York

Undergraduate Curriculum and Academic Standards Committee

New Course Proposal Form

When completed, this proposal should be submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Studies for

consideration by the Undergraduate Curriculum and Academic Standards Committee. The

proposal form with syllabus must be attached as one file only and emailed to

kkilloran@jjay.cuny.edu

1. a. Department(s) or program(s) proposing this course: English

b. Date submitted to Office of Undergraduate Studies:

c. Name and contact information of proposer(s):

Jay Walitalo

Email address(es): jwalitalo@jjay.cuny.edu

Phone number(s): 212.484.1192

2. a. Title of the course: Screenwriting for Film, Television and the Internet

b. Abbreviated title (not more than 20 characters including spaces, to appear on

student transcripts and in SIMS): Screenwriting

3. a. Level of this course:

____100 Level __X__200 Level ____300 Level ____400 Level

Please provide a brief rational for why the course is at the level:

Introducing students to the advanced characterization and narrative complexity

associated with writing for the screen builds on and follows logically from the

foundational creative writing skills, techniques and concepts presented in English 218.

b. Three letter course prefix to be used (i.e. ENG, SOC, HIS, etc.):

__ENG____________

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4. Course description as it is to appear in the College Bulletin. (Keep in mind that

this is for a student audience and so should be clear and informative; please

write in complete sentences; we suggest not more than 75 words.)

This course will introduce students to the methods and practices of contemporary

screenwriting as they apply to film, television and internet productions that involve

moving images. Students will explore screenwriting’s history, evolution, and relationship

to other forms of creative writing and consider the implications and consequences of

screenwriting’s relationship to justice issues. They will develop their own screenwriting

voices as they master the skills of synopsizing, writing, analyzing, critiquing, editing,

revising and rewriting. Successful students will develop an understanding of and

appreciation for the key elements of writing for the screen—setting, narrative structure,

dialogue, screen direction, and characterization—and will produce written works that

are original, well‐developed, and production‐ready.

5. Course Prerequisites or co‐requisites (Please note: All 200‐level courses must

have ENG 101 and all 300 & 400‐level courses must have ENG 102/201 as

prerequisites): English 102/201 and English 218 or Drama 110 or Literature 275

or permission of the instructor.

6. Number of:

a. Class hours ___3__

b. Lab hours _____

c. Credits ___3__

7. Has this course been taught on an experimental basis?

____ No

__X__ Yes. If yes, then please provide:

a. Semester(s) and year(s): Winter 2010; Fall 2010

b. Teacher(s): Jay Walitalo

c. Enrollment(s): 11; 26

d. Prerequisites(s): English 201

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8. Rationale for the course (will be submitted to CUNY in the Chancellor’s Report).

Why should John Jay College offer this course? (Explain briefly, 1‐3

paragraphs.)

A screenwriting course would contribute a new writing‐centered course to the

department’s new Writing Minor and a new film‐centered course to the new Film

Minor; it would also complement the film and creative writing courses already offered.

For students who have taken or are planning to take our other film courses, the course

would illuminate the connection between film and writing. For students who have taken

other creative writing courses, the course would draw connections from novels, plays

and short stories to screenplays. It would also provide them the opportunity to develop

an important skill as we move from print to internet and increasingly to internet‐based

films and video productions.

9. Course learning objectives:

a. Knowledge objectives:

(What do you expect students to know after taking this course?)

Students will have a firm understanding of:

1) Screenwriting’s history, evolution, and relationship to other forms of creative

writing.

2) Screenwriting’s relationship to justice issues.

3) The key elements of writing for the screen, including setting, narrative

structure, dialogue, screen direction, and characterization.

4) The vocabulary of screenwriting, including terms associated with critical

analysis and terms specifically associated with the practice of screenwriting.

5) The necessity of revision in creative writing.

6) The necessity of adhering to the conventions of standard written English in all

elements of the script/screenplay, with the exception of dialogue.

b. Performance objectives:

(What do you expect students to be able to do after taking this course? e.g.

computer skills, data presentation, forms of writing, oral communication,

research skills … )

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After completing the course, students will be able to apply their knowledge of

the basic elements of screenwriting—relevant settings; complicated and realistic

narrative structures; appropriate, socially relevant, believable and complex

characters; contextualized and natural‐sounding dialogue; coherent and relevant

action—to produce written works for the screen (film, television, and the

internet) that are original, well‐developed, camera‐ready and conform to

accepted formatting standards. They will also be able to comfortably navigate

computer software specifically designed for screenwriting.

c. Information literacy objectives:

i. Does the course require students to locate, evaluate and use

information to complete assignments? Please describe what you expect

them to do.

Yes. Students will be required to locate, retrieve and evaluate film and

television scripts from an online database of produced screenplays. They

will also be required to locate, retrieve and evaluate sources from

scholarly online databases such as Ebscohost Academic Search Complete

and Gale Literature Resource Center.

ii. Will students be required to use specific information tools other than

class readings – e.g. specific library databases, specific web sites, specific

reference books? Please identify.

Yes. Students will be required to access the Internet Movie Script

Database (http://www.imsdb.com/), an open‐source website, to access

film and television scripts. They will also be required to access specific

scholarly databases—such as Ebscohost and Gale Literature Resource

Center—through the John Jay Library website.

iii. How & where in the class calendar will students be taught in class

how to use these information tools?

Students will be taught how to access and use these tools during the first

two weeks of class.

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d. How do the above learning objectives relate to the objectives of the

program, major or minor?)

The course’s learning objectives will directly relate to and reinforce learning

objectives outlined in the Writing Minor guidelines:

Students will learn vocabulary terms specific to screenwriting and use these

terms as they critique each other’s work. Students will discover the importance

of making informed choices in creative writing as they study, discuss and write

about scripts written by noted screenwriters. Students will apply the knowledge

gained through the study of successful scripts to their own writing. Students will

learn that thorough revision is the key to good writing as they submit rough and

final drafts for all screenwriting assignments. Students will develop a creative

writing voice by producing works that are original in content and considerate of

both demographic and professional audiences.

The course’s learning objectives will also directly relate to and reinforce learning

objectives outlined in the Film Minor guidelines:

Students will learn about the history of film—particularly changes in film

technique, technology and style—as it relates to screenwriting. Students will

study the narrative features and structural elements of published screenplays

and write critically about them. Students will learn vocabulary terms specific to

film and screenwriting and use these terms to write about published

screenplays, screened films and each other’s work. Students will learn about the

plot structures, themes and narrative devices associated with various film

genres. Students will learn about screenwriting’s relationship to other forms of

creative writing, including prose fiction and playwriting.

e. Assessment:

How will students demonstrate that they have achieved these course objectives?

Students will produce seven screenwriting‐related assignments—three detailed

character biographies, a treatment, a first draft of a complete scene, a final draft

of a complete scene, a first draft of a full sequence, a final draft of a full

sequence, and a one‐page synopsis of a larger project that incorporates all

completed scenes and sequences—and a writing journal with entries that

demonstrate their knowledge of screenwriting’s history, evolution and

relationship to justice issues and other forms of creative writing. Students will

also take a final exam that will measure their knowledge of critical and

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screenwriting‐specific terms. At the end of the course, students will submit a

portfolio—containing all of the above assignments—to the instructor for

evaluation.

10. Recommended writing assignments

Indicate the types of writing assignments this course would require, as well as the

number of pages of each type. (Writing assignments should satisfy the College’s

guidelines for Writing Across the Curriculum. Go to

http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/undergraduatestudies/ and click the link for Writing Across

the Curriculum.)

Character biographies – 3 pages.

Treatment – 1‐2 pages.

First Draft of Scene – 4‐5 pages

Final Draft of Scene – 4‐5 pages

First Draft of Sequence – 12‐15 pages‐*

Final Draft of Sequence – 12‐15 pages

Synopsis – 1 page

Writing Journal Entries – 15 pages

11. Please meet with a member of the Library faculty prior to responding to Question

11. Please provide the name of the Library faculty member consulted below. (If

you are unsure who to contact, email Professor Ellen Sexton

(esexton@jjay.cuny.edu).

a. Are there adequate books currently in the Lloyd Sealy Library to support

student work in this course? (Please search the catalog, CUNY+, when

answering this question.)

____No

__X__Yes. If yes, please give some examples.

Parker, Philip (1999). The Art and Science of Screenwriting. Exeter,

England: Intellect.

Black, Irwin R. (1996). The Elements of Screenwriting. New York:

Macmillan.

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Geiger, Jeffrey (2005). Film Analysis; A Norton Reader. New York:

W.W. Norton.

Pinter, Harold (1973). Five Screenplays. New York: Grove Press.

b. Are there reference sources (print or electronic format) that would be

especially useful to students in this course?

____No

__X__Yes. If yes, please name them.

Grant, Barry K. (2007). Schirmer Encyclopedia of Film. Detroit:

Schirmer.

Monaco, James (1991). The Encyclopedia of Film. New York:

Perigree Books.

c. What books do you recommend the library acquire to support your course?

(Please attach a list, in a standard, recognized bibliographic format,

preferably APA.)

Please note: Library purchases are dependent upon budgetary considerations

and the collection development policy.

Towne, Robert (1997). Two Screenplays: Chinatown and The Last Detail.

New York: Grove Press.

Iglesias, Karl (2001). The 101 Habits of Highly Successful Screenwriters.

Avon, MA: Adams Media

d. Will students be directed to use any specific bibliographic

indexes/databases? (Please check the list of databases licensed by the

library before answering this question.)

____ No

__X__Yes. If yes, please name them.

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Biography References Bank

Biography Resource Center

Name of library faculty member consulted: Marta Bladek, Ph.D.

12. Are current College resources (e.g. computer labs, facilities, equipment)

adequate to support this course?

____No. (If no, what resources will be necessary? With whom have

these resource needs been discussed?)

__X__Yes

I have taught the course twice as an experimental, and in both cases

students were able to access and successfully use free online

screenwriting software (fivesprockets.com) to produce properly

formatted written work. Microsoft Word—which is available to students

in the John Jay computer labs—can also be utilized to produce

screenplay/script formats by changing the default settings.

13. Syllabus

Attach a sample syllabus for this course, which should be based on the College’s

model syllabus, found at

http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/undergraduatestudies/imagesUndergraduateStudies/

ModelSyllabus.pdf

The syllabus should include grading schemes and course policies. The sample

syllabus should include a class calendar with the following elements: a week‐byweek

or class‐by‐class listing of topics, readings (with page numbers), and

assignments. We suggest indicating that students get performance feedback by

before the 6th week of the semester. (If this course has been taught on an

experimental basis, an actual syllabus may be attached, if suitable.)

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14. Date of Department curriculum committee approval: 3/21/11

15. Course offerings

a. When will this course be taught?

Every semester, starting __________

One semester each year, starting ____2012______

One semester every two years, starting __________

b. How many sections of this course will be offered? __1___

c. Who will be assigned to teach this course?

Jay Walitalo

Jeffrey Heiman

16. Is this proposed course similar to or related to any course, major, or program

offered by any other department(s)?

__X__No

____Yes. If yes, what course(s), major(s), or program(s) is this course

similar or related to?

Did you consult with department (s) or program(s) offering similar or related

courses or majors?

__X__Not applicable

____No

____Yes. If yes, give a short summary of the consultation process and

results.

17. Will any course be withdrawn if this course is approved?

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__X_No

___Yes. If yes, number and name of course(s) to be withdrawn.

18. a) Approval by the Department Chair(s) or Program Coordinator(s):

Name(s): Allison Pease

Date of approval: 9/8/11

b) Will this course be part of any major(s), minor(s) or program(s)?

___No

__X_Yes. If yes, indicate the major(s), minor(s), or program(s) and

indicate the part, category, etc. (Please be specific)

Writing Minor

Film Minor

c) Please attach a letter, memo, or email of approval with a brief rationale for

the addition from the department chair(s) or program coordinator(s) [if other

than the proposer’s department].

Semester: _______________

ENGLISH ___, sec. __ (code#____)

M/W ___am/pm-___am/pm (__ period)

John Jay College, 445 W 59th, NY NY

Room ___, ______ Bldg.

Prof. Jay G Walitalo

jwalitalo@jjay.cuny.edu

Office: 619 W 54, Rm 767 (212) 484-1192

Office Hours: ______________ & by appt.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice English Department

English ____: Screenwriting for Film, Television and the Internet

Course Prerequisite:

ENG 102/201 and ENG 218 or Drama 110 or Lit 275 or permission of the instructor.

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Course Description:

This course will introduce students to the methods and practices of contemporary screenwriting as they

apply to film, television and internet productions that involve moving images. Students will explore

screenwriting’s history, evolution, and relationship to other forms of creative writing and consider the

implications and consequences of screenwriting’s relationship to justice issues. They will develop their

own screenwriting voices as they master the skills of synopsizing, writing, analyzing, critiquing, editing,

revising and rewriting. Successful students will develop an understanding of and appreciation for the key

elements of writing for the screen—setting, narrative structure, dialogue, screen direction, and

characterization—and will produce written works that are original, well-developed, and production-ready.

Course Objectives:

This course is designed to introduce you to the basic elements of screenwriting. A student experiencing a

successful outcome at the end of the course will have demonstrated:

 a working knowledge of critical terms associated with the analysis of screenplays

 a working knowledge of terms associated with the practice of screenwriting

 an understanding of screenwriting’s relationship to justice issues

 the ability to produce and develop complicated and realistic narrative structures

 the ability to produce and develop appropriate, believable and complex characters

 the ability to produce and develop relevant settings

 the ability to produce and develop contextualized and natural-sounding dialogue

 the ability to produce and develop coherent and relevant action

Course Requirements:

Students will be expected to fulfill the minimal requirements:

– Come to class. Class attendance is mandatory. Attendance is taken at the beginning of class. 3 lates = 1

absence. Four unexcused absences will cause the instructor to lower your final course grade by one-third of

a grade. If you accrue more than four (5+) unexcused absences—which is more than two week’s worth of

classes—you may fail the course. An absence will be considered “excused” if you have a doctor’s note or

some other documentation stating you needed to be somewhere during class time. You can also be excused

simply by informing the instructor of a necessary absence before that absence occurs.

– Complete and be ready to discuss all assigned readings.

– Participate in group activities and class discussions.

– Complete all assigned writing activities.

– Complete seven screenwriting-related assignments:

 three detailed character biographies

 a treatment

 a first draft of a complete scene

 a final draft of a complete scene

 a first draft of a full sequence

 a final draft of a full sequence

 a 1-page synopsis of your project

These assignments will be assigned and discussed in class.

– Maintain a writing journal. Each journal entry should be 200-250 words in length. Topics for the journal

will evolve from class discussions or be assigned by the instructor. Some journal entries will require the

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utilization of scholarly databases (via the JJ Library website) and/or other internet resources. Details on the

journal will be passed out and discussed in class.

– Present all completed work, including writing journal entries, in a final portfolio at the end of the course.

– Participate in peer review/evaluation activities.

– Participate in student-instructor conferencing.

Policies and Procedures:

Late papers: Late papers are accepted, but you lose one-third of a grade for every class past the due date.

Assignments more than 4 class periods late are not accepted (you get an F for that paper). No assignments

will be accepted after the last day of class.

Paper Formats: For character biographies and treatments: type and staple (no paper clips or folded corners)

all final drafts. Use the ‘Times New Roman’ 12pt. font and standard margins. Double-space. For script

scenes and sequences: use an appropriate screenwriting program (details in class) to maintain proper

formatting. All submitted scenes and sequences should be stapled or held together with brass fasteners (also

known as “brads” to screenwriters).

Tutoring: While all students are strongly encouraged to utilize the tutoring services available at the JJ

Writing Center, please note that WC tutors are generally not familiar with the fundamentals of writing for

the screen and thus may only be able to assist you with the character biography, treatment and synopsis

assignments. It is thus absolutely imperative that you attend class, takes notes, ask questions and work

closely with the instructor.

Plagiarism: Write everything IN YOUR OWN WORDS. From the John Jay Undergraduate Bulletin:

“Plagiarism is the presentation of someone else‘s ideas, words, or artistic, scientific, or technical work as

one’s own creation. Using the ideas or work of another is permissible only when the original author is

identified. Paraphrasing and summarizing, as well as direct quotations, require citations to the original

source. Plagiarism may be intentional or unintentional. Lack of dishonest intent does not necessarily

absolve a student of responsibility for plagiarism. It is the student’s responsibility to recognize the

difference between statements that are common knowledge (which do not require documentation) and

restatements of the ideas of others. Paraphrase, summary, and direct quotation are acceptable forms of

restatement, as long as the source is cited. Students who are unsure how and when to provide

documentation are advised to consult with their instructors. The Library has free guides designed to help

students with problems of documentation.” Any submitted work that contains plagiarized elements will

receive an automatic ‘F’. Repeated infractions will be reported to the college authorities.

Classroom procedures: Our classroom will function as a kind a workshop in which we will work our way

through the various steps of the screenwriting process, discuss problems of composing, share and critique

each other’s work, and develop a way of talking about how we write. Consequently, it is essential that you

attend class without fail and that you arrive with the reading and writing assignments prepared, in hand. In

short, to do well in this class you must be present—physically, mentally, and intellectually. Your

classmates and I need your contribution to classroom discussions if this is to be an enriching experience.

Classroom behavior: Personal electronic devices (smart phones, iPods, etc.) are great things to have, but

they are not appropriate for use in the classroom. Please turn all these devices off (not on ‘vibrate’) when

you come to class and do not answer, play with or engage in text messaging from your phone during

class. Do not sit in class with ear buds in your ears or headphones on. Please do not wander in and

out of class for any reason; it is distracting to the instructor and your fellow students. Use the bathroom,

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eat, make calls, etc. before or after class. And, finally, please do not eat in class.

Required Texts:

Screenplay: The Foundations of Screenwriting, Revised Edition by Syd Field. Published in 2005 by Delta.

ISBN:0385339038

Chinatown: Screenplay by Robert Towne. Published in 2000 by Faber & Faber. ISBN: 0571202241

Note: the texts may be supplemented with additional handouts. Please bring these readings to class with

you.

Exams:

There will be 1 multiple choice final exam on screenplay and critical terminology.

Grading:

Here’s how your final grade for the course will be determined:

 80% Contents Of Your Portfolio [with each of the seven screenwriting assignments counting as

10% of your final grade and the journal counting as another 10%]

 10% Final Exam

 10% Participation/Attendance

All papers submitted to the instructor and the final exam will be given a letter grade. The numerical values

assigned to each grade will correspond to the grade scale outlined in the John Jay Student Bulletin:

Grade and Numerical Value:

A 4.0

A– 3.7

B+ 3.3

B 3.0

B– 2.7

C+ 2.3

C 2.0

C– 1.7

D+ 1.3

D 1.0

D– 0.7

F 0.0

Explanation of Grades:

A, A– Excellent

B+, B, B– Very Good

C+, C Satisfactory

C–, D+, D, D– Poor [these are passing grades, but too many of these grades can lead to dismissal from the

College because of a low grade point average]

F Failure [an F is not erased when the course is

taken again and passed]

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Date Day’s Agenda Homework

Week 1/Day 1 Introductions.

Course overview.

Discussion (ongoing) of

critical and screenplayspecific

terminology

[handout: list of important

screenwriting and critical

terms]; a brief history of

screenwritng, part 1

Buy the textbooks listed

above. Read chapter 1,

Field, pp.15-30.

Week 1/Day 2 Lecture/Discussion:

What is a screenplay? How is

a screenplay similar to a play,

a novel, other forms of

creative writing? How is it

different? Who is the

“author” of a movie? What is

a shooting script?; a brief

history of screenwritng, part

2.

Read pp.1-20, Towne (+

journal entry). Journal:

discuss your understanding

of the history of

screenwriting. Use you class

notes and the internet.

Week 2/Day 1 Lecture/Discussion:

Basic screenplay structure:

Act 1 (the set-up), Act 2

(confrontation/conflict), Act

3 (resolution). Plot points.

Characterization.

Assignment 1: write your

character biographies.

Read pp. 21-35, Towne

(+journal entry). Read

chapters 3 and 4, Field, pp.

43-73.

Week 2/Day 2 Lecture/Discussion:

3 unities of dramatic action:

time, place, action.

You’ve created some

characters—now make them

do something.

Towne, p. 1-35.

Revise/edit your character

biographies. Read excerpt

from “Glengarry Glen Ross”

by David Mamet (handout).

Write journal entry for

“Glengarry Glen Ross”.

Week 3/Day 1 Film screening: “Glengarry Journal writing: Glengarry

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Glen Ross” (directed by

James Foley; screenplay by

David Mamet, US, 1992),

part 1.

Peer review/critiques:

character biographies.

Glen Ross, part 1. Complete

character biographies. Read

chapter 2, Field, pp.31-42.

Read Towne, pp.36-70

(+journal entry).

Week 3/Day 2 Film screening: “Glengarry

Glen Ross” part 2.

Lecture/Discussion: what

does Mamet’s screenplay

imply regarding the role of

competition in contemporary

society?; The Subject: what is

your screenplay about?

Assignment 1 (character

biographies) due.

Journal writing: Glengarry,

part 2. Read p. 35-60,

Towne (+journal entry).

Read sample treatment

(handout). Read chapter 13,

Field.

Week 4/Day 1 Lecture/Discussion:

What is a treatment?

Evolution of the screenplay

form.

Elements of the

contemporary screenplay,

part 1: the “master scene”

form, the slug line, action,

“suggestions”.

Assignment 2: begin

writing your treatment.

Read Towne, pp. 70-95

(+journal entry).

Week 4/Day 2

Lecture/Discussion:

Elements of the

contemporary screenplay,

part 2: new characters,

dialogue, stage directions,

transitions.

Towne, up to p. 95

Continue

writing/editing/revising your

treatment. Read chapters 5,

6 and 7, Field, pp. 74-105.

Week 5/Day 1 Peer review/critiques:

treatments.

Lecture/discussion:

How to resist camera

Complete your treatment.

Read Towne, pp. 95-120

(+journal entry). Read

chapter 10, Field, pp. 160-

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directions: using accepted

screenplay terms that achieve

the same thing.

182.

Week 5/Day 2 Lecture/discussion:

Towne, up to page 120.

Scene versus sequence;

continuity.

How to write a scene.

Assignment 2 (treatment)

due.

Read excerpt from

“Winter’s Bone” by Debra

Granik (handout). Journal

entry for “Winter’s Bone”

excerpt. Assignment 3:

write a scene.

Week 6/Day 1 Film screening: “Winter’s

Bone” (directed by Debra

Granik; screenplay by Debra

Granik, US, 2010), part 1.

Journal writing: Winter’s

Bone, part 1. Continue

working on your scene.

Read pp. 121-146, Towne

(+journal entry).

Week 6/Day 2 Film screening: “Winter’s

Bone”, part 2.

Class discussion: In what

ways does “Winter’s Bone”

address poverty and social

justice issues?; Towne, up to

page 146: can we see social

justice issues forming in

Towne’s script? What are

they? How do they function

in the larger narrative?

Peer review/critiques: scene

assignment.

Journal writing: Winter’s

Bone, part 2. Rewrite/revise

your scene based on

partner’s and instructor’s

comments.

Week 7/Day 1 Midterm Journal Reviews.

Student/Instructor

conferencing, part 1

Complete assignment 3

(first draft of scene). Read

chapter 11, Field, pp. 183-

198.

Week 7/Day 2 Midterm Journal Reviews. None.

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Student/Instructor

conferencing, part 2.

Assignment 3 (first draft

scene) due.

Week 8/Day 1 Lecture/Discussion:

In which ‘Act’ would your

completed scene be?

Beginning, middle, end of

each ‘Act’.

Building a sequence around

your completed scene.

Read 2 articles on

Chinatown (handouts).

Write journal entries for

both articles. Assignment 4:

write final draft of your

scene.

Week 8/Day 2 In-class workshop:

revising/rewriting the first

draft of your scene.

Lecture/discussion:

The Big Picture: scene

sequenceAct (including

‘plot points’)script.

Revise the first draft of your

scene. Read chapter 8, Field,

pp. 127-141.

Week 9/Day1 Film screening: “Chinatown”

(directed by Roman Polanski;

screenplay by Robert Towne,

US, 1974), part 1.

Assignment 4 (final draft of

scene) due.

Journal writing: Chinatown,

part 1. Assignment 5: begin

work on your “sequence”.

Week 9/Day 2 Film screening: “Chinatown”

(directed by Roman Polanski;

screenplay by Robert Towne,

US, 1974), part 2.

Discussion: What does

“Chinatown” say about the

relationship of wealth to

power and justice in

American society?

Lecture/discussion:

Making connections: how

scenes become an effective

sequence.

Journal writing: Chinatown,

part 2. Continue working on

your sequence.

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Week 10/Day 1 Lecture/discussion:

“Chinatown”: Roman

Polanski’s interpretation of

Towne’s script.

The importance of continuous

‘discovery’ in a screenplay.

When is a screenplay too

“populated”?

Journal writing: who is the

“author” of Chinatown?

Continue working on your

sequence.

Week 10/Day 2 Peer review/critiques:

sequences.

In-class workshop: is your

sequence a unit of dramatic

action unified by a single

idea? How might you modify

your first scene to make it

work with your new

scene(s)?

Revise/edit/rewrite your

sequence. Read chapter 14,

Field, pp. 238-256.

Week 11/Day 1 Lecture/discussion:

Learn the rules to break them:

plot, characterization,

structure; artistic

responsibility/ethics: taking

liberties with the facts; what

is entertainment’s

relationship to justice?

Continue

revising/editing/rewriting

your sequence. Read chapter

15, Field, pp. 257-274.

Week 11/Day 2 Lecture/discussion:

adaptation of existing works;

copyright; optioning.

Assignment 5 (first draft

sequence) due.

Read chapter 16, Field, pp.

275-288.

Week 12/Day 1 Lecture/discussion:

Collaborating on a script:

more issues of authorship.

Partners versus writing

teams.

Journal writing: discuss the

quote from James Joyce on

p. 142 (Syd Field) as it

relates to your own writing

experience.

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Final Exam: ________[date & time]_____________ in our regular room.

Week 12/Day 2 In-class workshop: preparing

the final draft of your

sequence.

Assignment 6: write final

draft of your sequence.

Week 13/Day 1 In-class workshop: preparing

the final draft of your

sequence.

Lecture/discussion:

How to write a 1-page

synopsis.

Revise/edit/rewrite first

draft of sequence.

Assignment 7: write a 1-

page synopsis of your

project.

Week 13/Day 2 In-class workshop: preparing

the final draft of your

sequence.

Revise/edit/rewrite first

draft of sequence.

Week 14/Day 1 Lecture/discussion:

What can you do with what

you have created in this

class? How do screenplays

get read (by producers)?

Internet productions, guerilla

filmmaking, trailers/teasers.

Put your portfolio together

(should include assignments

1 through 7)

Week 14/Day 2 Portfolio due (contains all

work—including all rough

and final drafts—completed

in the course)

Read chapter 17, Field, pp.

289-304.

Week 15/Day 1 In-class portfolio exchange. Journal writing: assess your

performance in the course

(350-400 words)

Week 15/Day 2 Final journal reviews.

Course overview.

How to prepare for the final

exam.

Study for the final exam.

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JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE

The City University of New York

Undergraduate Curriculum and Academic Standards Committee

Course Revision Form

This form should be used for revisions to course titles, prefixes/numbers, course descriptions,

and/or prerequisites. For small course content changes please also submit a syllabus.

(Please note: for significant content changes you may be asked to complete a New Course

Proposal Form).

Please complete every item and submit this form to the Office of Undergraduate Studies via email to

kkilloran@jjay.cuny.edu.

Date Submitted: 05/05/2010; Revision submitted 9/12/11

1. Name of Department or Program: Forensic Psychology

2. Contact information of proposer(s):

Name(s): Angela Crossman

Email(s): acrossman@jjay.cuny.edu

Phone number(s): 212‐237‐8653

3. Current number, title, and abbreviated title of course: PSY 272 – Correctional Psychology

(Abbreviated title can be found on SIMS)

4. Current course description: Explores the major psychological themes and problems in

rehabilitating the offender. Issues investigated will include the functions of the correctional

psychologist; the efficacy of behavior modification and other treatment modalities; training and

supervision of paraprofessionals in correctional settings; sexuality in prison; community‐based

corrections; prisoner classifications and assessment; prison violence; and the future of

correctional psychology.

a. Number of credits and hours: 3.0 credits/ 3.0 hours per week

b. Number of class hours (please specify if the course has lab hours): 3 (no lab hours)

c. Current prerequisites: Eng 101; PSY 101

5. Describe the nature of the revision: We would like to make the course a 300 level course

(making Eng 102/201 a new prerequisite) and add PSY 242 to the prerequisites. We would also

like to make a slight revision to the course description (see below)

6. Rationale for the proposed change(s): As we are changing the curriculum, we are making all

general electives that count toward the major as 300 level courses. Since this is a specialized

course, it requires a stronger foundation in psychology, which is more appropriate for the 300

level. This course already has a 10‐page paper and is being taught as a 300 level course.

Requiring PSY 242 (Abnormal Psychology) as a prerequisite enables the students to have

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knowledge of general psychopathology, which is vital when studying the correctional

population. It also ensures that students are better prepared when they take this course. The

course description would be slightly modified such that the words re‐entry and reintegration

would replace the term rehabilitate, as this word has become somewhat obsolete in the real

world of corrections, having been replaced with re‐entry and/or reintegration.

7. Text of proposed revisions (use NA, not applicable, where appropriate):

a. Revised course description: This course explores the major psychological themes and

problems in assisting the re‐entry and reintegration of the offender into society. Issues

investigated will include the ethics and functions of the correctional psychologist; the efficacy

of behavior modification and other treatment modalities; training and supervision of

paraprofessionals in correctional settings; sexuality in prison; community‐based corrections;

prisoner classifications and assessment; prison violence; and the future of correctional

psychology.

b. Revised course title: na

c. Revised number of credits and hours: na

d. Revised number of hours: na

e. Revised prerequisites: Eng 102/201; PSY 242

9. Enrollment in past semesters: 72 students spring 2010

10. Does this change affect any other departments?

_____ No

__X__ Yes

What consultation has taken place?

We notified the advisors/directors of the following programs of the proposed changes: the

Culture & Deviance Studies major (Dr. Hegeman), the Criminal Justice majors (Drs. Cauthen,

Latzer and Pollini), the chair of the Anthropology department (and minor advisor; Dr. Curtis),

and chair of the Sociology department curriculum committee (Dr. Karmen) of the proposed

changes.

11. Date of Department or Program Curriculum Committee approval: 05/05/2010

12. Signature(s) of Department Chair(s) or Program Coordinator(s) proposing this revision:

Thomas Kucharski

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PSY 3XX

Correctional Psychology

Spring 2011

Instructor: Gerard Bryant, Ph.D.

Class: Tuesday and Thursday from 6:25 PM to 7:40 PM in Room 2503 North Hall

Office Hours: Thursdays: 7:40 – 8:40pm and by appointment

Office: North Hall, Room 3508N

Phone: 718-840-5021(w) or 917-287-9250 (c).

E-mail: gbryant@bop.gov and gwbryant@jjay.cuny.edu.

Course Description:

This course explores the major psychological themes and problems in assisting the re-entry and

reintegration of the offender into society. Issues investigated will include the ethics and functions of

the correctional psychologist; the efficacy of behavior modification and other treatment modalities;

training and supervision of paraprofessionals in correctional settings; sexuality in prison; communitybased

corrections; prisoner classifications and assessment; prison violence; and the future of

correctional psychology.

Pre-requisites:

ENG 102/201, PSY 242

Required Text:

Allen, B., & Bosha, D. (1981). Games Criminals Play: How you can profit by knowing them.

Sacramento, CA: Rae John Publishers

Fagan, T., & Ax, R. (Eds.). (2003). Correctional mental health handbook. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Recommended Textbooks:

Correia, K. M. (2001). A handbook for correctional psychologists. Springfield, IL: C. C. Thomas.

Assigned Readings:

Additional readings will be posted on Blackboard throughout the semester, and are designated by

“AR” (assigned reading) on the class schedule. Examples are listed below.

1. Berg, M. T. & DeLisi, M. (2006). The correctional melting pot: Race, ethnicity, citizenship, and

prison violence. Journal of Criminal Justice, 34, 631-642.

2. Harris, P. J., Baltodano, H. M., Artiles, A. J. & Rutherford, R. B. (2006). Integration of culture in

reading studies for youth in corrections: A literature Review. Education & Treatment of

Children, 29, 749-778.

3. Kruttschnitt, C., Hussemann, J. (2008). Micropolitcs of race and ethnicity in women’s prisons in

two political contexts. British Journal of Sociology, 59, 709-728.

Learning Objectives:

After completing this course, students should be able to:

1. Identify the major issues related to re-entry and reintegration of offenders.

2. Critically analyze research articles related to correctional psychology.

3. Describe biopsychosocial, gender, cultural and ethnicity factors that may influence re-entry

and reintegration.

4. Describe the functions of and ethical issues facing correctional psychologists.

5. Describe current trends and issues in re-entry and reintegration.

6. Show improved written communication by use of instructor and peer feedback.

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Course Schedule

Date Topic Reading Assignment

2/1 & 2/3 Introduction/Offender Characteristics Chapters 1 & 2 in Correctional mental

and Classification health handbook. (Fagan & Ax, Eds.).

Chapters 1 & 2 in A handbook for

correctional psychologists (Correia).

——————————————————————————————————————————-

2/8 & 2/10 Introduction/Offender Characteristics Chapters 1 & 2 in Correctional mental

and Classification health handbook. (Fagan & Ax, Eds.).

*AR1

Mental Health Professionals Chapter 1 & 2 in A handbook for

correctional psychologists (Correia).

——————————————————————————————————————————-

2/15 & 2/17 Correctional Psychologists: Inmate Chapter 4 in Correctional mental health

Services and Programs handbook (Fagan & Ax, Eds.).

Chapter 3 in A handbook for correctional

psychologists (Correia).

——————————————————————————————————————————-

2/22 & 2/24 Correctional Psychologists: Inmate Chapter 4 in Correctional mental health

Services and Programs handbook (Fagan & Ax, Eds.).

*AR2

Chapter 3 in A handbook for correctional

psychologists (Correia).

——————————————————————————————————————————-

3/1 & 3/3 Substance Abuse Treatment Programs Chapter 5 in Correctional mental health

handbook (Fagan & Ax, Eds.).

——————————————————————————————————————————-

3/8 & 3/10 Mentally Ill Offenders/Suicide Prevention Chapter 6 in Correctional mental health

handbook (Fagan and Ax, Eds.).

——————————————————————————————————————————-

3/15 Mentally Ill Offenders/Suicide Prevention Chapter 6 in Correctional mental health

handbook (Fagan & Ax, Eds.).

——————————————————————————————————————————-

3/17 Mentally Ill Offenders/Suicide Prevention Chapter 6 in Correctional mental health

REVIEW FOR MID-TERM EXAM handbook (Fagan & Ax, Eds.).

TERM PAPER TOPIC DUE

——————————————————————————————————————————-

3/22/11 MID-TERM EXAM

——————————————————————————————————————————-

3/24 Female Offenders Chapter 7 in Correctional mental health

handbook (Fagan and Ax, Eds.).

AR3

——————————————————————————————————————————-

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——————————————————————————————————————————-

3/29 & 3/31 Sex Offenders Chapter 8 in Correctional mental

Sexual Abuse Prevention and Intervention health handbook (Fagan and Ax, Eds.).

Chapter 3 (pgs. 52-57) A handbook for

correctional psychologists (Correia)

3/31/11- BOOK CRITIQUE DUE

——————————————————————————————————————————-

4/5 & 4/7 Juvenile Offenders and Other Chapters 9 & 10 in Correctional mental

Special Offender Populations health handbook (Fagan & Ax, Eds.).

4/7/11 – LAST SESSION TO SUBMIT DRAFT OF TERM PAPER

——————————————————————————————————————————-

4/12 & 4/14 Correctional Psychologists: Staff Services Chapter 11 in Correctional mental

and Programs health handbook (Fagan & Ax, Eds.).

Chapter 7 in A handbook for correctional

psychologists (Correia).

——————————————————————————————————————————-

4/19 -4/26 No Class – Spring Break

——————————————————————————————————————————-

4/28 Correctional Psychologists: Staff Training Chapters 12 & 13 in Correctional

and Management Consultants mental health handbook (Fagan & Ax,

Eds.).

Chapter 7 in A handbook for correctional

psychologists (Correia).

——————————————————————————————————————————-

5/3 & 5/11 Ethics & Roles of Correctional Psychologists Chapters 3 in Correctional mental

health handbook (Fagan & Ax, Eds.)

Ward, T., & Salmon, K. (2009). The ethics of punishment: Correctional

practice and implications. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 14(4), 239-247.

——————————————————————————————————————————-

5/10 & 5/12 Community-based Corrections Assigned Articles

Re-entry, Reintegration and Continuity

of Care Issues 5/12/11 – TERM PAPERS DUE

——————————————————————————————————————————-

5/17 – 5/17 Research and the Future of Chapters 14 & 15 in Correctional mental

Correctional Psychology health handbook (Fagan & Ax, Eds.)

(REVIEW FOR FINAL EXAM)

Chapter 8 in A handbook for

correctional psychologists (Correia).

Ward, T., & Willis, G. (2010). Ethical issues in forensic and

correctional research. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 15(6), 399-409.

——————————————————————————————————————————-

5/24/11 FINAL EXAM

——————————————————————————————————————————-

Note: All in class lesson plans, i.e., PowerPoint Presentations will be available on Blackboard prior to

each class session. In the interest of “going green” it is each student’s responsibility to bring a copy of

the lesson plan to class on the specified date.

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Course Requirements:

Your final grade in this class will be determined by your performance in four areas: 1) two exams: a midterm

and final; 2) a term paper and other written assignments; 3) a book critique; and 4) class attendance,

preparation, and participation. Expectations and guidelines for each are described in detail below.

1) Mid-Term and Final Exams

There will be two examinations during the semester that will each consist of 50 multiple choice

questions, each worth two points, for a possible total of 200 points (i.e., each exam is worth 100

points) . Students are responsible for taking the exams on the scheduled date. Make-up exams will

not be scheduled. It is important to be on time for these exams. Persons arriving more than 20

minutes after the starting time will not be allowed to take the exam. Each exam consists of 25% of

your final grade for a combined total of 50% of your final grade.

2) Term Paper and Other Writing Assignments

Term papers are due on May 12, 2011. Students are free to select their topic in any area of

Correctional Psychology, however, the topic must be approved by the instructor no later than

March 17, 2011 (a sample list of topics will be provided by the professor prior to the due date). If

desired, students may submit a draft of the term paper for review, without penalty, on or before

April 7, 2011. Students who find writing assignments to be a challenge are especially encouraged

to take advantage of this opportunity.

The term paper should be 10 typed pages in length (not including cover and reference page) and

double-spaced. The paper should include the following:

A) A topic which highlights an area of interest, controversy or debate in correctional

psychology, policy, or practice;

B) Identification and explication areas of psychological research or theory which relate to the

area of interest, controversy or debate;

C) Recommendations for implementation of the proposal/solution, if applicable; and

D) Discussion of limitations and areas for further investigation.

Handwritten papers will be returned without a grade. At a minimum, a full letter grade will be

deducted off of any late term paper. Proofread your term paper as grammatical errors will result in

a lower grade. All references should be in American Psychological Association (APA) format.

Do not plagiarize, i.e., be sure to appropriately cite all work that is not your own (see attached).

During the course of the semester students may also be required to complete summaries and

critiques of class and text material; summaries of lectures, reading assignments, films, field trips,

etc.; descriptions of personal experiences relevant to the course and traditional essay assignments.

Proofread all writing assignments as grammatical errors will result in a lower grade. Completed

papers will receive a as a grade, a √+ if the assignment is completed in a highly satisfactory

manner and a √- if the assignment is completed in a less than satisfactory manner. Late papers

will automatically receive a √-.

This entire area counts for 25% of your final grade.

3) Book Critique – Paper Due March 31, 2011

Write a critique of the book titled “Games Criminals Play” by Allen and Bosta and provide

suggestions on how mental health providers should deal with manipulation and deception by

inmates in a correctional environment. The entire response for this written assignment is a

minimum of 3 double-spaced, typed pages.

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Handwritten papers will be returned without a grade. At a minimum, a full letter grade will be

deducted off of any late paper. Proofread your paper as grammatical errors will result in a lower

grade. This area counts for 15% of your final grade.

4) Attendance, Preparation, and Participation

This course is constructed to encourage active rather than passive learning. It is expected that each

student attend class, arrive on time, participate in class discussions, and complete

assignments/readings. Each student is individually held accountable for keeping up-to-date with

any changes in class/exam schedules and reading assignments. This area counts for 10% of your

final grade.

Computing your Final Grade:

Mid-Term Exam = 25%

Final Exam = 25%

Term Paper and Writing Assignments = 25%

Book Critique Paper = 15%

Attendance, Participation and Preparation = 10%

Total = 100%*

*Note: There will be an opportunity to complete extra credit assignments during the Semester.

**ALL ASSIGNMENTS AND EXAMS ARE MANDATORY, NOT OPTIONAL

Grading

Grades will be assigned as follows

93-100% A

90-92% A-

87-89% B+

83-86% B

80-82% B-

77-79% C+

73-76% C

70-72% C-

67-69% D+

60-66% D

Below 60% F

Please Note!

Policy on Excessive Absences: John Jay College’s policy dictates that students are expected to attend all

class meetings as scheduled. Excessive absence from class will result in a failing grade for the course

(WU) and may also result in loss of financial aid (see College Bulletin). As such, any student who is

excessively absent (a total of 3 unexcused absences) will be given a failing grade regardless of how well

they are doing in the class. (No exceptions to this policy!)

Classroom Etiquette: Please respect your classmates desire to learn in an environment free from

unnecessary distractions. NO Phones, Text Messaging, Radios, Eating, Sleeping, Talking/Side

Discussions, Leaving Class Early and Distractions!

All written assignments must be submitted in a hard copy form. If you e-mail an assignment to me you

must submit the paper at the following class session or place a copy in my mailbox in Room 2100A.

Please make child care arrangements, if necessary, as children are not permitted to attend this class.

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Statement of College Policy on Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the presentation or someone else’s ideas, word or artistic, scientific, or technical work as

one’s own creation. Using the ideas or work of another is permissible only when the original author is

identified. Paraphrasing and summarizing, as well as direct quotations, require citations to the original

source.

Plagiarism may be intention or unintentional. Lack of dishonest intent does not necessarily absolve a

student of responsibility for plagiarism.

It is the student’s responsibility to recognize the difference between statements that are common

knowledge (which do not require documentation) and restatements of the ideas of others. Paraphrase,

summary, and direct quotation are acceptable forms of restatement, as long as the source is cited.

Students who are unsure how and when to provide documentation are advised to consult with their

instructors. The Library has free guides designed to help students with problems of documentation.

(From the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Undergraduate Bulletin)

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JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE

The City University of New York

Undergraduate Curriculum and Academic Standards Committee

Course Revision Form

This form should be used for revisions to course titles, prefixes/numbers, course descriptions,

and/or prerequisites. For small course content changes please also submit a syllabus.

(Please note: for significant content changes you may be asked to complete a New Course

Proposal Form).

Please complete every item and submit this form to the Office of Undergraduate Studies via email to

kkilloran@jjay.cuny.edu.

Date Submitted: September 1, 2011 (resubmitted with revision from March 2011)

1. Name of Department or Program: Anthropology

2. Contact information of proposer(s):

Name(s): Ed Snajdr

Email(s): esnajdr@jjay.cuny.edu

Phone number(s): (212)237‐8262

3. Current number, title, and abbreviated title of course: ANT 208 Cities and Culture

(Abbreviated title can be found on SIMS)

4. Current course description:

The basic concepts and perspectives of anthropology are used to examine

the many different subcultures and groups which make up the urban

environment, both in the United States and in other complex societies. It

examines how these groups both conflict with and cooperate with each

other, as they compete for urban space and urban resources. The course

includes examination of deviant behavior as it exists within the context of

the urban environment, and the ways in which the special characteristics

of cities relate to the emergence and maintenance of a great diversity of

lifestyles and subcultures.

a. Number of credits and hours: 3

b. Number of class hours (please specify if the course has lab hours): 3

c. Current prerequisites: ENG 101 and sophomore standing or above

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5. Describe the nature of the revision: Change the title of this course and update the course

description to reflect the current content and approach of this 200‐level course in the subfield

of urban anthropology.

6. Rationale for the proposed change(s): These changes reflect the current content and

approach of this 200‐level course in the subfield of urban anthropology.

7. Text of proposed revisions (use NA, not applicable, where appropriate):

a. Revised course description:

Current topics and problems in urban studies will be addressed from an

anthropological perspective. The course examines cities as places where members of

different groups come together in both cooperation and conflict. Students will

examine the way global processes and local politics and culture have shaped and

continue to transform the modern city. Students will engage with case studies from a

variety of urban environments, including some in the United States, and will focus on

various topics such as class, power, ritual, migration, lifestyle, ethnic tensions and

alliances, social movements, and the meanings of space and place.

b. Revised course title:

ANT 208 Urban Anthropology

c. Revised number of credits and hours: N/A

d. Revised number of hours: N/A

e. Revised prerequisites: N/A

8. Enrollment in past semesters: 80

9. Does this change affect any other departments?

___X_ No

_____ Yes

What consultation has taken place?

10. Date of Department or Program Curriculum Committee approval: May 31, 2010

11. Signature(s) of Department Chair(s) or Program Coordinator(s) proposing this revision:

Ed Snajdr (Departmental Curriculum Committee __________hardcopy signed_______________

Ric Curtis (Department Chair) ___________________hard copy signed__________

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Approve d by UCASC, September 16, prepared for College Council, October 19, 2011

JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE

The City University of New York

September 2011

Model Syllabus Revision

This document contains a list of required elements for syllabi for John Jay College of Criminal

Justice. This list adheres to best practices in higher education. Your syllabus represents a

contract between you and your students and reflects the care and time you expect them to take

with their assignments.

Syllabus Content:

College name and address

Course title and section (i.e. Syllabus for English 101-01)

Professor‘s name

Office location

Office hours: (Specify appointment or walk-in)

Phone

E-mail address

Course description

Learning outcomes

 What will the student know or be able to do by the end of the course? List three to

five course outcomes that map to the program’s outcomes. (All Writing Intensive

courses need to include a writing intensive outcome that maps to the program’s

outcomes).

Course pre-requisites or co-requisites

Requirements / Your course policies

 Specify your policies on acceptable methods of citation/documentation and

formatting

 Policies on lateness, absence, classroom behavior, etc.

Required Texts

 List all texts with full citation including ISBN numbers. Indicate if ordered and

available in the bookstore, on the web with URL, on course Blackboard site, on ereserve

etc. Specify if the library owns the book and the call number.

Grading

 How will you determine the final grade? List assessments. Include, for instance,

participation, assignments, exams and quizzes and provide percentage of the

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Approve d by UCASC, September 16, prepared for College Council, October 19, 2011

final grade for each. Syllabi for Writing Intensive courses should include both the

number and type of assignments required by the program.

Course calendar

 List theme and key topics for each week. Include reading and other assignments

due.

College wide policies for undergraduate courses (see the Undergraduate Bulletin, Chapter

IV Academic Standards)

A. Incomplete Grade Policy

B. Extra Work During the Semester

C. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Policies

Sample syllabus statement: “Qualified students with disabilities will be provided reasonable

academic accommodations if determined eligible by the Office of Accessibility Services (OAS).

Prior to granting disability accommodations in this course, the instructor must receive written

verification of a student’s eligibility from the OAS which is located at 1233N (212-237-8144). It

is the student’s responsibility to initiate contact with the office and to follow the established

procedures for having the accommodation notice sent to the instructor.”

Source: Reasonable Accommodations: A Faculty Guide to Teaching College Students with

Disabilities, 4th ed., City University of New York, p.3.

(http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/studentlife/Reasonable_Accommodations.pdf)

Statement of the College Policy on Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the presentation of someone else‘s ideas, words, or artistic, scientific,

or technical work as one‘s own creation. Using the ideas or work of another is

permissible only when the original author is identified. Paraphrasing and

summarizing, as well as direct quotations require citations to the original source.

Plagiarism may be intentional or unintentional. Lack of dishonest intent does not

necessarily absolve a student of responsibility for plagiarism.

It is the student‘s responsibility to recognize the difference between statements that are

common knowledge (which do not require documentation) and restatements of the ideas

of others. Paraphrase, summary, and direct quotation are acceptable forms of

restatement, as long as the source is cited.

Students who are unsure how and when to provide documentation are advised to consult

with their instructors. The Library has free guides designed to help students with

problems of documentation. (John Jay College of Criminal Justice Undergraduate

Bulletin, http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/academics/654.php , see Chapter IV Academic Standards)

For a syllabus template, see the Faculty eHandbook on the Center for Teaching website at:

http://resources.jjay.cuny.edu/ehandbook/planning_syllabus.php#syllabus

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Form GS.001.9 1

John Jay College. Form GS. 001.9

Office: Academic Affairs

Department: Graduate &

Professional Studies

Contact:

Last Modified:

NEW GRADUATE COURSE PROPOSAL FORM

When completed and approved by the appropriate Graduate Program, this proposal should be submitted

to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies for the consideration of the Committee on Graduate

Studies. The proposal form with a syllabus and bibliography must be attached as one file and sent by

email to jcarrington@jjay.cuny.edu.

1. a. PROGRAM proposing this course: CRIMINAL JUSTICE

b. Date submitted to the Office of Graduate & Professional Studies: February 7, 2011

c. Name and contact information of the proposer(s): Joseph Pollini –

jpollini@jjay.cuny.edu

2. a. TITLE OF THE COURSE: CRJ 7XX Investigation of Violent Crime

b. Abbreviated title (not more than 20 characters including spaces, to appear on students

transcripts and in SIMS):

Invest of Viol Crime

3. a. COURSE DESCRIPTION as it is to appear in the bulletin: (This should be clear and

informative; no more than 75 words).

This course considers theoretical and practical issues related to violent crime investigation. As a

theoretical matter, it examines the special issues associated with the investigation of violent

crime, in particular the problems that arise in addressing public concern when violent crimes are

unsolved and the particular kinds of investigative strategies appropriate for various types of

violent crimes. Court materials are employed to introduce students to legal issues associated with

search and seizure, interrogation of suspects, and production of bodily fluids. Students are

introduced to investigative techniques associated with rape, homicides, serial murders,

kidnapping, and activities by gangs.

b. Course Prerequisites:

None

c. Number of:

I. Class hours 3

II. Lab hours 0

III. Credits 3

4. Has this course been taught on an experimental basis?

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Form GS.001.9 2

Yes ___X___ No _______

If yes, please provide the following:

I. Semester(s) and Year(s): 2005-present

II. Teacher(s): Joseph Pollini

III. Enrollment(s): 27

IV. Prerequisite(s): none

5. RATIONALE FOR COURSE: (will be submitted to CUNY in the Chancellor’s Report). Why

should this program offer this course? (Explain briefly, 1-3 paragraphs).

Policing is centrally concerned with the detection and prevention of violent crime. No single

issue causes greater public fear than the threat of random acts of violence. Even when crime

occurs among intimates (and so is not an immediate threat to the public’s sense of security), there

is a general sense that the public peace has been breached. This course offers a way to think

about violent crime in a society committed to the preservation of individual freedom. It thus

mediates between crime control policies that aim simply at the suppression of violent crime and

permissive policies that offer little hope of detecting it or preventing its occurrence.

6. COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

a. Knowledge Objectives: (What do you expect students to know after taking this course?)

1-Understand how investigators develop cases and information leading to the identity and

prosecution of violent offenders. They will also learn the sources of crucial information that

will aid in the solution of these cases.

2-They will have a comprehensive knowledge of homicide crime scenes and how an

investigation progresses from the initial police notification, the correct police response that

follows, and the subsequent steps necessary to conduct an intelligent investigation.

3-Know the underlying causes of serial murders, which include biological, psychological and

sociological factors. There will be an analysis of cultural, historical and religious factors that

influence myths and stereotypes of serial killers and what role they play in serial murder

investigation.

4-They will have a working knowledge of current violent gangs and how they adversely

impact society. They will know how to develop long and short term investigations against

violent gangs. This will include identifying and gathering active and passive types of

intelligence, developing an investigative plan, utilizing city, state and federal resources and

measuring operational effectiveness.

5-They will have a working knowledge of how to conduct a kidnapping investigation, from

the initial 911 call to the final ransom payment and recovery of the victim. Students will

know how to set up a command post, conduct operations in a residence where ransom calls

are received, surveillance operations, ransom payments and selection of a courier.

b. Performance Objectives: (What do you expect students to be able to do after taking this

course? e.g. data presentation, assessments, research …).

1-Students should have the ability to properly document the steps of an investigation and

have good investigative habits.

2-They will know how to conduct an investigative interview and be able to identify

discrepancies in a suspects accounting of events.

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Form GS.001.9 3

3-They will know how to preserve evidence and process a crime scene.

4-They will be able to categorize a serial killer as either an organized or disorganized

offender and know how to develop an offender profile, crime scene profile and victim profile.

5-They will be able to identify evidentiary issues that could affect outcome of a case.

6-They will know how to work within the confines of the law to build sold criminal cases.

c. Assessment:

How will students demonstrate that they have achieved the objectives of the course?

1-Through the use of examinations, papers and presentations.

7. Proposed texts and supplementary readings: (ISBN Number is required).

Text:

Geberth, V. (2006). Practical Homicide Investigation. Florida: CRC Press/Taylor & Francis Group.

SBN: 0‐8493‐3303‐2.

Hickey, E.W. (2010). Serial Murderers and Their Victims. California: Wadsworth Publishing.

ISBN: 13:978‐0‐495‐60081‐7.

Supplementary readings:

Sandoval, V. (2008). Interview Clues Words That Leave an Investigative Trail. FBI Law

Enforcement Bulletin, 77 no1 1-9 Ja 2008.

Bond, C.F., Jr., & DePaulo, B.M. (2006). Accuracy of deception judgements. Personality and

Social Psychology Review, 10, 214-234.

Bond, C.F., Jr., & DePaulo, B.M. (2008). Individual differences in judging deception: Accuracy

and Bias. Psychological Bulletin, 134, 477-492. Doi:10.1037/003-2909.134.4.477

DePaulo, B.M., Lindsay, J.J., Malone, B.E., Muhlenbruck, L., Charlton, K., & Copper, H. (2003).

Cues to deception. Psychological Bulletin, 129, 74-118.

DePaulo, B.M., Charlton, K., Cooper, H., Lindsay, J.J., & Muhlenbruck, L. (1997). The accuracyconfidence

correlation in the detection of deception. Personality and Social Psychology

Review, 1, 346-357.

Hartwig, M., & Bond, C.F., Jr. (2011). Why do lie-catchers fail? A lens model meta-analysis of

human lie judgments. Psychological Bulletin, 137, 643-659.

Wilson, H. (2003). A Four-Domain Model for Detecting Deception: An Alternative Paradigm for

Interviewing, FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin 72 no6 19-24 Je 2003.

Volumes:

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Form GS.001.9 4

Granhag, P.A., & Stromwall, L.A. (Eds.). (2004). The detection of deception in forensic

contexts. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Vrij, A. (2008). Detecting lies and deceit: Pitafalls and opportunities (2nd ed.). New York, NY:

Wiley.

Hoover, L. (2006). Law Enforcement Response at a Crime Scene: Protecting Lives and

Preserving the Admissibility of Evidence. FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, 75, no.4 25-

32 Ap.

Ford. C. (1996). Lies! Lies! Lies!: The Psychology of Deceit. American Psychiatric Press, (n2)

200.

Wilson, H (2003). A Four-Domanin Model for Detecting Deception: An Alternative Paradigm for

Interviewing, FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin 72, no.6 19-24 Je.

Sandoval, V. (2008). Interview Clues Words that Leave an Investigative Trail. FBI Law

Enforcement Bulletin.

Dazzi, C. (2009). Graphology and Personality:An Empirical Study of Validity of Handwriting

Analysis. Psychology Reports, 105, 3, 1255-1268.

Akin, L. (2005). Blood Spatter Interpretation at Crime and Accident Scenes: A Basic Approach.

FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, 74, no.2 21-4.

Wagstaff, G. (2008). Hypnosis and the Law: Examining the Stereotypes. Criminal Justice and

Behavior, 35: 1277-1294.

8. Library resources for this course: Please consult with a member of the Library faculty before

completing the following sections of this question. Please provide the name of the Librarian

consulted below.

Kathleen Collins-re:ereserve

9. Identify and assess the adequacy of available library resources

a. Databases

b. Books, Journals and e Journals

c. All of the above supplementary readings are available in the Criminal

Justice Journal Article Data Bases

10. Identify recommended additional library resources

11. Estimate the cost of recommended additional library resources (For new courses and

programs)

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Form GS.001.9 5

12. Please list any specific bibliographic indices/databases to which students will be directed for

this course. (Please check the list of databases licensed by the library before answering this

question).

No ___________ Yes ____X_______. If yes, please include the names.

EJournals

13. Are current College resources (e.g. Computer labs, facilities, equipment) adequate to support this

course?

Yes _____X_______ No _____________ (If no, what resources will be needed? With whom

have these resource needs been discussed?)

14. Proposed instructors: Joseph Pollini

15. Other resources needed to offer this course: None

16. If the subject matter of the proposed course may conflict with existing or proposed courses

in other programs, indicate action taken:

N/A

17. Syllabus: Syllabus is attached.

Attach a sample syllabus for this course, which should be based on the College’s model syllabus,

found at:

http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/ModelSyllabus.pdf.

The syllabus should include grading schemas and course policies. A class calendar with the

following elements: a week‐by‐week listing of topics, readings with page numbers and all other

assignments must be included.

[If this course has been taught on an experimental basis, an actual syllabus may be attached.]

18. Date of Approval by the Program: February 7, 2011

19. Date of Approval by the Committee on Graduate Studies: September 8, 2011

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JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE

THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK

CRJ 7XX‐INVESTIGATION OF VIOLENT CRIME

FALL 2011

Professor Joseph A. Pollini

Law Police Science Department‐T422‐38

Office phone‐212‐237‐8409

Cell phone‐917‐969‐1711

Office Hours‐Monday/Wed. 9‐1 and 2‐4 or by appointment

Assigned Text Books:

Geberth, V. (2006). Practical Homicide Investigation. Florida: CRC Press/Taylor & Francis Group. ISBN:

0‐8493‐3303‐2.

Hickey, E.W. (2010). Serial Murderers and Their Victims. California: Wadsworth Publishing. ISBN:

13:978‐0‐495‐60081‐7.

Additional materials posted on John Jay College Library, Electronic Reserve site.

Course Description:

This course considers theoretical and practical issues related to violent crime investigation. As a

theoretical matter, it examines the special issues associated with the investigation of violent crime, in

particular the problems that arise in addressing public concern when violent crimes are unsolved and

the particular kinds of investigative strategies appropriate for various types of violent crimes. Court

materials are employed to introduce students to legal issues associated with search and seizure,

interrogation of suspects, and production of bodily fluids. Students are introduced to investigative

techniques associated with rape, homicides, serial murders, kidnapping, and activities by gangs.

Course Objectives:

At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to:

1. Understand how investigators develop cases and information leading to the identity and

prosecution of violent offenders. They will also learn the sources of crucial information that will

aid in the solution of these cases.

2. They will have a comprehensive knowledge of homicide crime scenes and how an investigation

progress from the initial police notification, the correct police response that follows, and the

subsequent steps necessary to conduct an intelligent investigation.

3. Know the underlying causes of serial murders, which include biological, psychological and

sociological factors. There will be an analysis of cultural, historical and religious factors that

influence myths and stereotypes of serial killers and what role they play in serial murder

investigation.

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4. They will have a working knowledge of current violent gangs and how they adversely impact

society. They will also know how to develop long and short term investigations against violent

gangs. This will include identifying and gathering active and passive types of intelligence,

developing an investigative plan, utilizing city, state and federal resources, and measuring

operational effectiveness.

5. They will have a working knowledge of how to conduct a kidnapping investigation, from the

initial 911 call to the final ransom payment and recovery of the victim. Students will know how

to set up a command post, conduct operations in a residence where ransom calls are received,

surveillance operations, ransom payments and selection of a courier.

Apart from the above, this course will prepare students to:

1. Learn good investigative habits

2. Identify problems before they adversely affect the outcome of a case

3. Knowing how to work within the confines of the law to build solid criminal cases

Course requirements

1. In‐class examinations‐there will be two in‐class examinations. The first examination will be

given roughly halfway through the course (Midterm Examination) and will consist of all

material covered in class up until this point. There will be a second examination given on

our assigned Final date, which will be one week after our final regular class. It will be given

in the same classroom and held from 4:15‐6:15 PM. The Final examination will consist of all

material covered in class starting from the first lecture after the Midterm exam to the last

lecture of the semester.

2. Papers and oral presentation‐You will complete an 8‐10 page final research paper on an

assigned topic from the areas of violent gangs, kidnapping and serial murderers. You should

consult at least 10 sources other than classroom readings. More information on this paper,

the assignment of topics to students and the oral presentation, will be revealed in class.

3. Classroom participation‐Students may be called upon throughout the semester to share the

details of what they have discovered through working on their final papers as well as the

content of the assigned readings. Students should display respect for other students’

opinions and refrain from any personal attack during discussions. In addition, cell phones

should be turned off before class begins. Also, please try and be punctual for class. You are

ultimately responsible for all material that is either assigned or presented in class.

Examinations

Students will be given 2 written examinations during the course of the semester. The first

examination will be given at the halfway point of the semester and the second examination will be given

on the classes scheduled final examination date. Excusals are only granted for a serious medical

condition. The student must supply a medical note from a licensed medical doctor explaining why the

student could not be present on the day of the exam. All excusals are at the discretion of the instructor.

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On the date of your examination, you will have the entire period to complete the test. Once the

examination starts, no one is permitted to leave the examination room until you finish your exam and

turn it into the instructor.

Calculation of the final grade

Assignment Percent of

Final grade

Midterm examination 35%

Final examination 35%

Papers/presentations 20%

Classroom participation 10%

There will be no extra credit assignments given to students to improve their grades. All assignments are

due on the scheduled submission date and will not be accepted after the designated submission date.

Policy on plagiarism

Plagiarism is the act of presenting another person’s ideas, research or writings

as your own. The following are some examples of plagiarism, but by no means is it an

exhaustive list:

 Copying another person’s actual words without the use of quotation marks and

footnotes attributing the words to their source

 Presenting another person’s ideas or theories in your own words without

acknowledging the source

 Using information that is not common knowledge without acknowledging the source

 Failing to acknowledge collaborators on homework and laboratory assignments

Internet plagiarism includes submitting downloaded term papers or part of term

papers, paraphrasing or copying information from the Internet without citing the

source, and “cutting and pasting” from various sources without proper attribution.

(From the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Graduate Bulletin, p. 89)

Students who are unsure how and when to provide documentation are advised to

consult with their instructors. The Library has free guides designed to help students

with problems of documentation.

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Tentative Course Schedule

Lesson Topic/Assignment

#1 Introduction to the investigation of violent crime. An overview of the investigation

of homicide, serial crime, kidnapping, and violent gangs. The duties of the first

officer responding to a crime scene will be discussed.

Geberth: Chapters 1, 2, 3

Supplementary Readings:

Hoover, L. (2006). Law Enforcement Response at a Crisis Scene: Protecting Lives and

Preserving the Admissibility of Evidence. FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, 75 no4 25‐32

Ap 2006.

#2 Preliminary and specific duties of the investigator at the scene of the crime. How to

Conduct an interview v. interrogation.

Geberth: Chapters 4, 5. Video of simulated interrogations. Truthful v. Untruth

Suspects.

Supplementary Readings:

Sandoval, V. (2008). Interview Clues Words That Leave an Investigative Trail. FBI Law

Enforcement Bulletin, 77 no1 1‐9 Ja 2008.

Bond, C.F., Jr., & DePaulo, B.M. (2006). Accuracy of deception judgements. Personality

and Social Psychology Review, 10, 214‐234.

Bond, C.F., Jr., & DePaulo, B.M. (2008). Individual differences in judging deception:

Accuracy and Bias. Psychological Bulletin, 134, 477‐492. Doi:10.1037/003‐

2909.134.4.477

DePaulo, B.M., Lindsay, J.J., Malone, B.E., Muhlenbruck, L., Charlton, K., & Copper, H.

(2003). Cues to deception. Psychological Bulletin, 129, 74‐118.

DePaulo, B.M., Charlton, K., Cooper, H., Lindsay, J.J., & Muhlenbruck, L. (1997). The

accuracy‐confidence correlation in the detection of deception. Personality and Social

Psychology Review, 1, 346‐357.

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Hartwig, M., & Bond, C.F., Jr. (2011). Why do lie‐catchers fail? A lens model metaanalysis

of human lie judgments. Psychological Bulletin, 137, 643‐659.

Wilson, H. (2003). A Four‐Domain Model for Detecting Deception: An Alternative

Paradigm for Interviewing, FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin 72 no6 19‐24 Je 2003.

Volumes:

Granhag, P.A., & Stromwall, L.A. (Eds.). (2004). The detection of deception in forensic

contexts. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Vrij, A. (2008). Detecting lies and deceit: Pitafalls and opportunities (2nd ed.). New York,

NY: Wiley.

#3 Laws that effect how investigators perform their jobs. Lineups, search warrants,

exceptions to the search warrant rule, Miranda, automobile searches, plain view

doctrine, consent, etc.

Crime scene photos and crime scene sketches‐there importance and purpose.

Electronic Reserve: Legal Bulletins

Geberth: Chapters 6, 7.

#4 The Homicide Crime Scene Search, Estimating the Time of Death, Blood Spatter

Interpretation , Handwriting Interpretation –Document Examination

Geberth: chapters 8, 9. Handouts‐Blood Spatter, Handwriting

Supplementary Readings:

Dazzi, C. (2009). Graphology and Personality: An Empirical Study of Validity of

Handwriting Analysis. Psychology Reports, 105, 3, 1255‐1268 2009.

Akin, L. (2005). Blood Spatter Interpretation at Crime and Accident Scenes: A Basic

Approach. FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, 74 no2 21‐4 F 2005.

#5 The Identity of the deceased (hypnosis, polygraph, dental), death notification, modes

of death‐weapons (ballistics,

other weapons used for violence).

Geberth: chapters 10, 11, 12, 20.

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Supplementary Readings:

Wagstaff, G. (2008). Hypnosis and the Law: Examining the Stereotypes. Criminal Justice

and Behavior, 35: 1277‐1294 2008.

#6 Suicide Investigation(distinguishing between homicide and suicide), the investigation

of Sex‐related Homicides

Geberth: chapters 13, 14.

#7 Midterm examination

#8 Homosexual Homicides, Narcotics‐related Homicides, Serial Murders I

Geberth: chapters 15, 23.

Hickey: chapters 1, 2, 3.

#9 Serial Murder II‐Social Construction of Serial Murder, Sexual Predators, Healthcare

Killers.

Hickey: chapters 4,5,6

#10 Serial Murder III‐Male Serial Killers, Team Killers, Female Killers

Class paper/presentation due‐Serial Killers‐Organized v. Disorganized Killers

Hickey: chapters 7,8,9

#11 Victims of Serial Killers, Interviewing Serial Murderers, Profiling, Apprehension and

Disposition

Class paper/presentation continued

Hickey: chapters 10, 12, 13. Handout‐Profiling

#12 Profiling continued, FBI Behavior Science Unit

#13 Violent Gang Investigations‐Gathering Active/Passive Intelligence, Top Down/Bottom

Up Investigations, Long/Short Term Investigations, Operation Effectiveness.

Class paper/presentations due‐Gangs

#14 Kidnapping Investigations‐Initial Notification to PD/FBI, Preliminary Investigation,

Setting up a Command Post, Duties of the Residence Team, Surveillance, Ransom

Payment.

#15 Final Examination

90


Humanity in Action Fellowship

 

2012 HIA FELLOWSHIP
June 1 – July 1, 2012
Amsterdam · Berlin · Copenhagen · Lyon · Warsaw

 

Do you know any students ready to change the world?

 

Dear Senior Fellows,

 

Humanity in Action (HIA) is now accepting applications for our 2012 Fellowship Programs in Europe from talented college students and recent college graduates.

 

HIA invites applications from college students and recent graduates who are intellectually gifted, mature, independent and passionate about human rights. Current sophomores, juniors, and seniors and graduates from the classes of 2010 and 2011 are eligible to apply.

 

 

The HIA Fellowship brings together international groups of Fellows to study minority rights and produce research exploring how and why individuals and societies, past and present, have resisted intolerance and protected democratic values. Separate programs will take place for five weeks in Amsterdam, Berlin, Copenhagen, Lyon, and Warsaw.

 

Applications are due on January 9, 2012.

 

Intensive and demanding, the HIA Fellowship features daily lectures and discussions with renowned academics, journalists, politicians, and activists, as well as site visits to government agencies, non-profit organizations, museums and memorials. Participation requires a great deal of intellectual curiosity and stamina, as well as the ability to work effectively in international teams.

 

After the program, Fellows participate in the global alumni network of HIA Senior Fellows and can take advantage of special professional fellowship opportunities such as internship programs in the U.S. Congress and European Parliament.

 

We hope you will share this email widely with students and recent graduates whom you think would benefit from this opportunity. Students of all academic disciplines, interests, and backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

 

If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact our staff atadmissions@humanityinaction.org.

 

Warmly,
Judy

 

Dr. Judith S. Goldstein
Founder and Executive Director
Humanity in Action
www.humanityinaction.org

 

About Humanity in Action

 

Humanity in Action is an international educational organization. HIA educates, inspires and connects a global network of young leaders who are committed to promoting human rights, diversity and active citizenship—in their own communities and around the world.

 

HIA works with university students and young professionals in Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Denmark, France, Germany, Hungary, Israel, the Netherlands, Poland,Sweden, the United Kingdom, the United States and Ukraine.


Kaplan Practice Test

FREE Kaplan Practice Test & Strategy Session Event at NYU!!

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We look forward to seeing you on campus and getting you started on your road to grad school!

Law School Fair @ St. John’s University

The Ronald H. Brown Center for Civil Rights and Economic Development is pleased to present its annual: Diversity Day and Admissions Fair Date Saturday, November 12, 2011 Time 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. Location St. John’s School of Law 8000 Utopia Parkway Queens, N.Y. 11439 Participating Law Schools Albany Law School Ave Maria School of Law Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law Yeshiva University Boston College Law School Boston University School of Law Brooklyn Law School City University of New York School of Law Cornell Law School Duke University School of Law Florida International University College of Law Fordham University School of Law Hofstra University School of Law John Marshall Law School Loyola University Chicago School of Law New York Law School Pace University School of Law Quinnipiac University School of Law Roger Williams University School of Law Seton Hall University School of Law Southern University Law Center St. John’s University School of Law Suffolk University Law School Syracuse University College of Law Thomas M. Cooley Law School Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center University of Buffalo School of Law University of Colorado Law School University of Massachusetts School of Law, Dartmouth Western New England University School of Law Program Agenda 8:30 – 9 a.m. Registration and Continental Breakfast Solarium | Ground Floor 9 – 9:05 a.m. Welcome Belson Moot Court Room | Second Floor Leonard M. Baynes Professor of Law Director, The Ronald H. Brown Center for Civil Rights and Economic Development St. John’s School of Law 9:30 – 10:45 a.m. Panel 1: What Makes Your Law School Application Special? Panelists Dorothy Moran Associate Director, Office of Admissions St. John’s School of Law John R. Nussbaumer Professor of Law Associate Dean, Auburn Hills Campus Thomas M. Cooley Law School Martha Probst Assistant Director for Career Development Florida International University College of Law Lillie V. Wiley-Upshaw Vice Dean for Admissions and Financial Aid University at Buffalo Law School State University of New York 10:15 – 10:45 a.m. Panel 2: How to Prepare for Law School: Ronald H. Brown Prep Program for College Students Alumni Speak Moderator Janai S. Nelson Associate Professor of Law Associate Director, The Ronald H. Brown Center for Civil Rights and Economic Development St. John’s School of Law Panelists Steve Fils-Aime, St. John’s School of Law ’13 Ebosetale Okojie, Duke Law School ’13 Irma Rivera, New York Law School ’12 Ezra Salami, Fordham Law School ’14 10:45 – 11:15 a.m. Keynote Speaker Hon. Charles B. Rangel ’60 U.S. Congressman New York, 15th District 11:15 – 11:45 p.m. Lunch Solarium | Ground Floor Noon – 2 p.m. Law School Admissions Fair: General Admission Cafeteria | Ground Floor 2 – 4 p.m. Speed Interviews for the Ronald H. Brown Juniors Cafeteria | Ground Floor RSVP Please let us know if you will attend our Diversity Day and Admissions Fair by completing and submitting the online RSVP Form. The RSVP deadline is Thursday, November 10, 2011. More Information Kristen Guiseppi-Ferguson guiseppk@stjohns.edu (718) 990-8076 RSVP

Freshman Gala

One of the coolest no I mean THEEEEE kkkkkooolest event is happening for Freshmen this Thursday, October 6th! It is taking place in the Cafeteria from 7-11pm. The Freshmen Gala was proposed last year by Student Government Freshmen Representatives: Davinder Paul Singh, Alex Griffith, and Akuba Bebo. The event went so well last year that Student Government has decided to do it again except BIGGERRRR along with First Year Experience, Office of Student Life, Urban Male Initative, Office of Student Affairs, and The Seek Department. It is beginning with students entering in with the Red Carpet as their names and major gets announced. It is a spotlight event for all freshmen to be applauded at John Jay College! Then President, Jeremy Travis will say a couple of words. We are also having dance and singing performances from student organizations. A lot of raffles are being given out, like seriously a lot of raffles! From MacBooks to iPads to Gift cards! Students just have to love it!🙂 Dinner will be served and the night cannot get better than this! I will be attending so I am looking forward to meeting many of you. I really hope you take this opportunity to come and interact with other students along with enjoying a great start to your freshmen year🙂

By: Mehak Kapoor- Vice President of Student Government

New Sociology Course

New Sociology 300 Course Approved September 22, 2011

Course description as it is to appear in the College Bulletin. (Keep in mind that this is for a student audience and so should be clear and informative; please write in complete sentences; we suggest not more than 75 words.)
This course is an introduction to evaluation research. Program evaluation uses social science theory and research methods to study, appraise, and help improve programs in non-profit organizations, educational systems, governmental departments, and businesses. In this class, students will become familiar with the various types of program evaluations and will gain practical experience through a series of exercises involving the design of a conceptual framework, development of indicators, and the development of an evaluation plan.

Sociology Course Description

Sociology 3xx: Evaluation Research Approved September 22, 2011

This course is an introduction to evaluation research. Program evaluation uses social science theory and research methods to study, appraise, and help improve programs in non-profit organizations, educational systems, governmental departments, and businesses. In this class, students will become familiar with the various types of program evaluations and will gain practical experience through a series of exercises involving the design of a conceptual framework, development of indicators, and the development of an evaluation plan or a critical assessment of an evaluation plan.
Very few programs these days are funded without requiring an evaluation component, often conducted by an independent researcher such as a professor. For those of you interested in practitioner jobs, agency personnel also need to be familiar with evaluation procedures because they must participate in the process and be smart about what to ask of their evaluators. Policymakers who face limited resources want to know if programs work and if they should re- fund programs or fund additional ones in other communities. Not just any person can conduct program evaluations—or at least conduct them well. This class is designed to give you both the book knowledge and some practical experience in the details of program evaluation. Consequently, it includes lecture, readings, and exercises. Specifically, (at the discretion of your professor) you will locate a program that has been proposed or implemented [For example, “No Child Left Behind” or “DARE”] for which you can locate extensive published information about how it would be/ was implemented. You will then develop a program evaluation plan for this program. Or, alternatively, you will located an existing evaluation plan during the semester and develop a critical assessment of the plan.

Research Methods and Statistics for Criminal Justice

Research methods and Statistics for Criminal Justice Approved September 22, 2011

Course description as it is to appear in the College Bulletin. (Keep in mind that this is for a student audience and so should be clear and informative; please write in complete sentences; we suggest not more than 75 words.)
This course will present the research process, types of studies, appropriate descriptive statistical techniques and guidelines for formulating research questions and testable hypotheses. It will also review methods of how variables are constructed, how data are collected and analyzed, how to decide on selecting an appropriate population to be studied, sampling methods and sample size, various research designs including experiments, and quasi‐experimental for example, surveys, as well as other forms of data collection and existing data bases. Students will also be exposed to qualitative methodologies including ethnography, observation, content‐analysis, and interviewing techniques.

Human Rights Studies Minor Description

Human Rights Studies Minor Approved September 22, 2011

The Human Rights Studies minor will introduce student to some of the key conceptual, ethical and methodological approaches to the study and practice of human rights. In particular, it will address key concepts, principles and norms, such as human dignity, non‐discrimination, equality, due process, empowerment, human security, human development, and accountability; it will expose students to diverse disciplinary and methodological approaches to the study and practice of human rights from a domestic as well as an international perspective; it will familiarize students with the evolution of international human rights norms both in theory and in practice, the latter through the study of pivotal events in the history of human rights, such as the anti‐slavery and anti‐slave trade campaign, the Civil Rights Movement, the Campaign Against Apartheid, the transnational movement spawned by the Helsinki Final Act, and, more recently, the campaign to establish the International Criminal Court and the launching of the Millenium Development Goals; it will train students how to use the human rights framework in order to analyze and assess critical developments in key issue areas of global concern; and it will provide students with internship opportunities so as to hone their advocacy skills in addressing the challenges of an increasingly complex and interconnected world. This minor can be paired with several majors, including Gender Studies, Global History, Humanities and Justice, International Criminal Justice, and Political Science.

History of Slavery Course Description

History of Slavery Course Approved September 22, 2011

Course description, as it is to appear in the College bulletin: (Write in complete sentences except for prerequisites, hours and credits.)
This course will introduce students to the history of slavery from the ancient Greco- Roman world to the emergence of “New World” slavery and the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Students will examine the economic, social, and political structures allowing for the practice and growth of slavery, and the implications of such transformations. Students will gain a firm understanding of the different ways people understood and practiced slavery (and other forms of unfreedom) in the premodern world, and the global legacy of these institutions.